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LIRR Disruptions Frustrating Commuters

LIRR

LIRR Train (Credit: Daniel Barry/Getty Images)

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MINEOLA, N.Y. (CBS 2 / WCBS 880) – Disruptions on the Long Island Rail Road continued on Sunday at only a third of its schedule.

Due to track work construction, many commuters were forced to take buses from Mineola to Jamaica station.

CBS 2’s Derricke Dennis reports that those commuters are not happy.

“It’s ridiculous, and now here I am in the freezing cold, waiting for my bus because their schedules are thrown off because of the train. It’s very irritating,” Karen Doran, of Hempstead, said.

Not only are there these delays, but Long Island commuters are also sharing the ride with thousands of spectators taking in the New York City Marathon.

LISTEN: WCBS 880′s Mike Xirinachs reports from Port Washington, N.Y.

Runner Chris Hiller got up early to catch the LIRR out of Port Washington where he said that line has always been reliable.

“Oh, it’s always been faithful and dependable,” Hiller said.

Hiller wasn’t just confident about the LIRR, but about his marathon, too.

“I’m going to come in first, win all the prize money. Actually, it’s my first marathon and I’m very excited,” Hiller said.

The weekend track work means the only trains with direct service to and from Penn Station are the Long Beach, Babylon, and Port Washington Branches with only three trains an hour.

Commuters taking the Huntington, Port Jefferson, Oyster Bay, Hempstead and Ronkonkoma branches will have to take buses for part of their trip.

The limited and disrupted train schedule comes as the LIRR runs a final battery of tests to bring its World War I-era signal system into the new century.

LIRR officials are urging people to use alternate transportation, or just be patient.

“I’m just trying to get to work and get home, fortunately I’m going the opposite direction, I’m going east, and even east the trains don’t run that well as it is,” Tracey Carter, of Roosevelt, said.