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Woman, 85, Charged In Deadly Westchester Hit-And-Run

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85-year-old Bridget Gambone faces a felony charge of fleeing the scene after a hit-and-run accident that killed a beloved Yonkers teacher.

85-year-old Bridget Gambone faces a felony charge of fleeing the scene after a hit-and-run accident that killed a beloved Yonkers teacher.

Tony Aiello thumbnail Tony Aiello
Tony Aiello serves as a CBS 2 general assignment reporter. After...
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NEW YORK (CBS 2) – A deadly hit-and-run in Westchester left a beloved school administrator dead, and an 85-year-old woman is facing a felony charge for fleeing the scene.

Bridget Gambone said nothing after being fingerprinted and posing for a mug shot, and she had little to say when she spoke to Bronxville police, reports CBS 2’s Tony Aiello.

“It was not productive in trying to find out why she left the scene, or what may have caused her to impact Ms. Chasin,” Bronxville Police Chief Christopher Satriale said.

The victim, 59-year-old Sheryl Chasin, was a widely respected administrator with Yonkers schools.

Chasin was struck and killed Thursday evening as she crossed Kraft Avenue on her way to a pub for an awards dinner. Police say Gambone hit the victim, knocking her to the street, and then hit her again.

“Witness statements and investigation reveal that Mrs. Gambone stopped her vehicle, backed up over Ms. Chasin, and then fled the scene,” Satriale said.

Bob Krause and his wife were attending the awards dinner and saw the immediate aftermath of the fatal accident.

“Nobody knew at the time exactly how bad it was, but to find out later on, it was just horrible inside for everybody,” Krause, of Yonkers, said.

It was horrible, too, for a second driver who failed to see the victim lying on the street – and also ran the victim over. That driver remained at the scene and won’t be charged.

“[The second driver was] destroyed, leaning against the wall – I mean, what can she say?” witness Michelle MacMillan said.

Chasin leaves behind an adult daughter – and countless friends at Yonkers public schools. The superintendent called Chasin “the district’s conscience – the angel on the staff’s shoulder, guiding colleagues to do the right thing and stay on the right path.”

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