CBS2-Header-Logo WFAN 1010WINS WCBS tiny WLNYLogo

News

Ice Storm Safety Tips

View Comments
Commuters walk in Times Square during a snow storm on February 25, 2010 in New York City. (credit: Spencer Platt/Getty Images)

Commuters walk in Times Square during a snow storm on February 25, 2010 in New York City. (credit: Spencer Platt/Getty Images)

CBS New York (con't)

Affordable Care Act Updates: CBSNewYork.com/ACA

Health News & Information: CBSNewYork.com/Health

NEW YORK (CBSNewYork) - The ice storm hitting the Tri-State area is creating a profound safety concern for pedestrians and drivers alike.

SEE: Ice Storm Photos

Experts offer the following suggestions as you hit the streets, to help make sure the streets don’t hit you.

For pedestrians:

- Be especially careful on the steps while getting on or off buses, or up and down subway stairs. They are particularly hazardous. “Most importantly, they should [you] should always use the handrail,” Dr. Geoffrey Westrich told 1010 WINS reporter Alice Stockton-Rossini. Westrich is an orthopedic surgeon at the Hospital for Special Surgery in Manhattan.

LISTEN: 1010 WINS’ Alice Stockton-Rossini with Dr. Westrich


- Westrich advises pedestrians to wear boots or shoes with rubber soles that offer excellent traction. Dress for the weather, and skip fancier shoes you might wear to an office on a typical day. Shoes with leather bottoms are apparently the worst in this weather, says Westrich.

- The New York City Parks and Recreation Department wants you to remember that ponds and lakes may appear frozen, but venturing onto them is extremely dangerous and can cause potentially fatal accidents. Never go on frozen waters (unless clearly marked otherwise with official signs). If you are on iced-over water and you hear cracking, immediately lie down to distribute your weight: it may save your life. For more guidance, see our Winter Safety Guide.

Radar Forecast & Alerts | School Closings | Traffic & Transit Guide | On-Air: 1010 WINS | WCBS 880

For motorists:

- Know before you go! Check the latest traffic and transit conditions before you hit the road.

- Use major streets or highways for travel whenever possible as these roadways will be cleared first.

- Drive slowly. Vehicles, including those with 4-wheel drive, take longer to stop on snow and ice than on dry pavement.

- Keep the name and phone number of at least one local towing service in your car in case you break down or become stuck.

-If you do get stuck on the road stay with your car and contact a towing company.

View Comments