Keeping Bees Safe During Winter

NEW YORK (WCBS 880) – While some worry about shovels and snow blowers during the winter, Stone Barns in Pocantico Hills is worried about their bees.

WCBS 880 Reporter Catherine Cioffi traveled along with beekeeper Dan Carr to check on the little insects who are essential to the farm.

WCBS 880 Reporter Catherine Cioffi finds out how the keep the bees alive.

“In wintertime, they are all clustering together to stay warm,” said Carr.

As the bees cluster to stay warm, sometimes they won’t move away from the cluster to get honey which can lead to starvation.

Snow and ice coat the hives and to check on the vitality of the bees, Carr walks around with a stethoscope listening to the hives as he gives them a knock.

img00095 20110203 1115 Keeping Bees Safe During Winter

Photo: Catherine Cioffi/WCBS 880

“Bees can get hypothermia just like people,” said Carr.

The bees are vital to the success of the farm. If these bees die, the farm won’t have any bees to pollinate their crops in the spring.

“As soon as that first thaw comes and that first blossoms start, we want the bees to get out,” said Carr.

Until then, there is going to be a lot more checking to make sure no bee is going hungry.

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  • Kim

    Why cant they move the bees into a controlledd temperature environment for the duration of this harsh winter? If they are so essential to the farm you would think they would have thought about this.
    Bees are already endangered.

    • Mari N.

      Because bees need a cleansing flight if they are kept in temperatures that are too warm. You need to keep them colder so they are inactive and don’t spend all their energy and literally just burn out.
      Keeping bees is pretty complex. The bees know when it’s winter and when it’s time to “hibernate” if you will.

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