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Mayor Defends New Health Dept. Policy On French Fries, Bagels & Stinky Perfumes

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Mayor Michael Bloomberg (Stephen Lovekin/Getty Images)

Mayor Michael Bloomberg (Stephen Lovekin/Getty Images)

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NEW YORK (CBSNewYork) – Mayor Michael Bloomberg defended a new set of employee guidelines Monday set forth by the New York City Department of Health.

In an apparent effort to lead by example, the Health Department’s “Life in the Cubicle Village” includes of list of what employees can eat and smell like ahead of the agency’s move to its new headquarters in Long Island City, Queens.

“They’ve got to put out some guidelines — how much they’re followed, I don’t know. But there is nothing wrong with them and if they didn’t do it, you’d be criticizing them,” Bloomberg told reporters, including 1010 WINS’ Stan Brooks.

1010 WINS’ Stan Brooks hears from Mayor Bloomberg

The new rules bar fried foods like french fries in addition to banning strong perfumes and colognes. The department also suggests cutting bagels and muffins into halves or quarters and serving air-popped popcorn during agency meetings and events, WCBS 880′s Rich Lamb reported.

WCBS 880′s Rich Lamb details the Health Department’s new guidelines

Many Health Department workers declined to speak to CBS 2 about the guidelines on Monday.  However, one employee who did said fellow workers were “fine with them,” adding “it’s all for our good health.”

“Supposing the Health Department did not have in their snack bar stuff that was all dietetic and good for you, you’d be going crazy with the story in the other direction,” Bloomberg told members of the media.

The new guidelines state cookies should not be served when there is a celebration cake at an agency gathering. In addition,  the department also said that employees should not eavesdrop, limit conversations, and set cell phones to vibrate.

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