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Study: Hormonal Contraceptives Could Wreck Relationships

Various Birth Control May Zap Some Of The Woman's Desire
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Birth Control Pill (file)

Birth control pills. (Photo by Tim Matsui/Getty Images)

CBS New York (con't)

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NEW YORK (CBSNewYork) — There’s a surprising new study out about men, women and birth control.

Scientists say the pill and other contraceptives could take an unexpectedly heavy toll on your relationship, reports CBS 2’s Derricke Dennis.

The dynamics of love and lust is complex enough as it is.

“Sometimes guys don’t understand which way is up with women, so,” said Jea Edmond of the Upper West Side.

And now there’s even more confusion. The new study says birth control, and other hormonal contraceptives, could make or break a relationship, affecting a woman’s desire.

“Well, it appears that birth control may be decreasing the natural hormones that a woman puts out or signals. Now, obviously, this is important if one is looking for a mate, long-term partner and father of your children,” Dr. Jacques Moritz said.

But can birth control break the bond between a man and woman? One couple Dennis spoke to couple had a mixed opinion.

“I don’t think it should be a problem, if you really like the person you’re with you know,” said Wilson Tenorio of Jamaica, Queens.

“It’s not natural. You don’t know what’s going into your body. You don’t know what’s really going to change you,” added Lynette Aracena.

Others called the study weird science.

“Because if you really like somebody, you really love somebody, that shouldn’t change you,” said Kimberly McLeod of Baychester.

“You don’t believe it, no, not at all,” added Dante Pierre.

Dr. Jane Greer has been a relationship therapist for 25 years and said the loss of interest between men and women, often times, has nothing to do with the pill at all.

“There’s something else going on in the relationship that is creating distance, and perhaps the turnoff that might be taking place sexually,” Dr. Greer said.

It’s important to remember, this is just one study. Researchers said more information is needed on whether the pill is a turn-on, or a turnoff.

More than 92 million prescriptions for hormonal contraceptives, including pills, patches and injections, were filled last year in the United States.

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