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NTSB Wants Records On Flight 3407 Pilot

WASHINGTON (CBSNewYork/AP) — Federal accident investigators are ordering a regional air carrier to turn over previously withheld records regarding the qualifications of the pilots involved in the crash of Continental Connection Flight 3407 near Buffalo in 2009.

National Transportation Safety Board Chairman Deborah Hersman said in a statement Thursday that she was disappointed to learn that Pinnacle Airlines Corp. of Memphis, Tenn., the parent company of Colgan Air, hadn’t provided the accident investigators internal emails relevant to the qualifications of Flight 3407’s captain.

The emails recently surfaced in a lawsuit by victims’ families. Attorneys for the families say the emails indicate that airline officials had doubts about the captain’s flying skills.

Pinnacle has said the captain was properly trained and qualified to fly the plane.

Sound off in our comments section below…

(Copyright 2011 The Associated Press. All Rights Reserved. This material may not be published, broadcast, rewritten or redistributed.)

  • starviego

    The statements of eyewitnesses on the ground strongly support the conclusion that mechanical problems brought down flt 3407, not pilot error. It is probable that a malfunctioning propellor control unit(PCU) caused the prop to ‘disc,’ resulting in an uncommanded roll which led to the crash.

  • michaelfury
  • michaelfury
  • Jeff O'Hara

    I have heard that this captain had failed numerous check rides based on his reactions to stall recoveries. Any student pilot knows that the proper procedure if a stall is imminent is to push forward on the yoke and gain speed by getting the nose lower. This captain did the exact opposite. When the plane’s systems warned him that he was entering a stall his response was to pull back on the yoke. The second he did so he doomed all passengers and crew.

    The flying public has the right to know that the pilots of commercial aircraft are fully capable of safely operating the plane. It is apparent that this was not the case in the Buffalo crash.

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