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Islanders To Face Sidney Crosby On Monday

(Photo by Bruce Bennett/Getty Images)

(Photo by Bruce Bennett/Getty Images)

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PITTSBURGH (AP) — Sid the Kid is back.

Pittsburgh Penguins superstar Sidney Crosby will make his season debut on Monday against the New York Islanders, his first game in nearly a year since being sidelined with concussion-like symptoms.

Crosby hasn’t played since taking head shots in consecutive games in January against Washington and Tampa Bay.

The 2007 NHL MVP spent the last 10 months undergoing a painstakingly thorough rehabilitation that left him wondering when — or even if — he’d play again and forced the league to take a harsher stance when it comes to policing head hits.

His return ends weeks of speculation that appeared to put the ever-polite Crosby on edge but hardly bothered his teammates. The 24-year-old declined repeated interview requests in recent weeks as the speculation about a possible return date reached a fever pitch.

Crosby missed the remainder of the 2010-11 season after taking a hit from Tampa Bay’s Victor Hedman on Jan. 5. The expected brief absence turned into an extended one that rendered him a spectator for Pittsburgh’s loss to the Lightning in the opening round of the playoffs.

He vowed to be ready for training camp but spent much of the summer in seclusion in his native Canada, his silence fueling speculation his career may be in jeopardy.

Crosby came forward in September and — flanked by the two doctors who have overseen his recovery — said it was “likely” he would be back this season.

He began training camp wearing a white helmet to signify he wasn’t to be hit, working feverishly for a month before switching to a black helmet after being cleared for contact on Oct. 13.

Coach Dan Bylsma preached caution, though his teammates did their best to accommodate their captain, jostling with him in practice when given the opportunity.

Crosby only missed one skate since camp began in September, skipping a practice in Los Angeles on Nov. 5 so he could travel back east to visit with his medical team.

His teammates stressed there was no need for Crosby to rush, and the Penguins have been one of the league’s top teams through the season’s first six weeks.

Pittsburgh entered Friday atop the Eastern Conference behind the crisp goaltending of Marc-Andre Fleury and a dynamic offense led by Evgeni Malkin and James Neal.

Yet the Penguins understand they’re not the same without Crosby.

“We know what he means to this team, this city,” defenseman Kris Letang said. “He’s a special player.”

One that spent months dealing with “fogginess” that at times made it difficult for him to drive or watch television. He also endured painful migraines and likened the recovery process to a roller coaster.

The ride appears to be finally pulling into the station, sending Crosby out into the great unknown.

For all the steps he’s taken during his recovery, the real test will come when he gets hit for the first time at full speed. Though the nature of the game may be changing thanks in part to Crosby’s ordeal.

New discipline czar Brendan Shanahan, only three years removed from his playing days, has been suspending players for taking unnecessary head shots at opponents. It’s a movement Crosby embraces.

“A guy’s got to be responsible with his stick, why shouldn’t he be responsible with the rest of his body when he’s going to hit someone?” Crosby said. “Whether it’s accidental or not accidental, you’ve got to be responsible out there.”

He hasn’t backed down during practice, often being one of the last to leave the ice before heading to the dressing room.

The Penguins have raved about Crosby’s intensity during even the more informal skates. While he’s looked perfectly fine to the naked eye, Crosby wouldn’t allow himself to come back until he was at full strength.

“Maybe I can get by with 90 percent, maybe I couldn’t but I’m not going to roll the dice with that,” Crosby said in September.

When he finally glides onto the ice in his No. 87 jersey, Crosby will put to rest speculation his career was over. His teammates, who did their best to give Crosby distance over the summer, never doubted he would return.

“I figured he was getting enough of it from everywhere else,” teammate Jordan Staal said. “All that matters to us really is that he’s healthy. All that stuff you thought you heard, I didn’t pay any attention to it.”

How quickly it takes Crosby to get back to his pre-injury level is uncertain.

He was playing arguably the best hockey of his brilliant career before getting hurt, leading the league in goals and points as the Penguins steamrolled through the first three months of the season.

The team soldiered to a fourth-place finish in the Eastern Conference despite missing Crosby, Malkin and Staal. The magic disappeared in the playoffs as the Penguins lost in seven games.

Crosby’s comeback pushes a team considered a Stanley Cup contender into a Stanley Cup favorite. Yet after months and months of rumors and worry, Crosby’s return is cause enough for celebration.

“We know how badly he wants to play,” teammate Matt Cooke said. “We want it too, because it means that he’s healthy, and that’s all you ever really want for him.”

Copyright 2011 The Associated Press.