Travel + Leisure Magazine Names New York As The Rudest City In America

NEW YORK (CBSNewYork) — The nerve!

Travel + Leisure magazine has determined New York is now the rudest city in America, knocking three-time champion Los Angeles out of the top spot.

Some New Yorkers tell 1010 WINS’ Terry Sheridan we’re just misunderstood.

1010 WINS’ Terry Sheridan reports

“There are great people in New York, we’re just in a rush,” one man said. “New York is an upbeat place… we don’t sleep, you know, 24/7 – go, go, go.”

“We want to get to where we gotta go,” another man said. “It’s not a bad city, I’ve been to other places where they’re ruder.”

T+L asked readers to rank 35 cities for its annual survey in a number of categories including best pizza and most pedestrian-friendly streets.

Judging by the results, there did seem to be a trend: the bigger the city, the bigger the attitude.

People in smaller cities tend to take life a little easier, so it may come as no surprise that New Orleans, Savannah and Charleston were all ranked in the top five cities for friendliness.

Everything moves at a New York minute in the Big Apple, so every once in a while, we may lose our patience with tourists when they stop in the middle of the sidewalk to gawk at the skyscrapers.

Here’s the full list:

    1. New York City
    2. Miami
    3. Washington, D.C.
    4. Los Angeles
    5. Boston
    6. Dallas/ Forth Worth
    7. Atlanta
    8. Phoenix/Scottsdale
    9. Baltimore
    10. Orlando, Fl
    11. Philadelphia
    12. Las Vegas
    13. Anchorage
    14. Chicago
    15. San Francisco
    16. Houston
    17. Seattle
    18. Providence, RI
    19. San Diego
    20. Salt Lake City

Do you think we deserve the title? Which city do you think is the rudest? Let us know below…

Comments

One Comment

  1. Robert Match says:

    Hay, with 10 million people all trying to get somewhere, bumping in to someone having a bad day is better than average. Mostly I have found that nowhere else can you strike up a conversation with a complete stranger faster than in NYC. Just stand in front of the big screen in time square when a playoff game is on. You won’t be alone egging on a running back making the yardage! Mostly NYC is a nice place to visit but living there isn’t for the faint of heart (unless you’ve got the bucks!)

  2. keb says:

    I’ve lived in the Bronx & worked in Westchester over 12 years now (grew up in Midwest). Yes, it’s pretty rude, I’m sorry to say. The horrible customer service you generally receive in retail situations (including restaurants) never ceases to astound me. And in commuting, the drivers are very aggressive and impatient. Even the kids on the playgrounds are unnecessarily aggressive and competitive. That said, I’m glad I had the opportunity to live here for awhile and experience it for myself-both the good and the bad. I don’t think I’ll ever call NYC “home” no matter how long I live here, and will probably move away when my kids reach school age.

  3. Edward Bissen says:

    With 50 million tourist last year, I don’t think New Yorker’s can take all the credit for this honor🙂

  4. Lily Alejandra says:

    i don’t agree with the person who wrote that, I just moved to New york and I was amazed by the people because they actually really nice and if you need help they get in group and try to help you, they actually give you they’re spot in the Metro if they see you with an discapacity and help you out with direccions, I think they only rushing to go what they need to but when someone need then they work to help you out sometimes in group they are like partners even when they don’t know eachother, so sorry for that person that wrote this articules because not just because one thing happen to her or him to said they are rude, she became the rudes one by writing this.

  5. ronin says:

    NYers are not rude, the tourists that are…

  6. John Poyotte says:

    just like some people say we are missunderstood newyork is go go city everybody is rying to get where they are going

  7. John Poyotte says:

    just like some people say we are missunderstood its 247 and every body is on the go

  8. Fred says:

    This whole poll is foolish and opinionated. It’s truly not worth time of any form. Who judged this? Who was polled? When was this conducted? What were the parameters? How was this poll advertized? All results are then therefore skewed. And who really cars if one city is ruder then others. Rudeness is subjective depending on the reign of the world you are in. For example, taking something handed to you in India with your left hand is considered the HEIGHT of rudeness. I can imaging that the judgement of entire cities of people as rude may seem very rude to the people of those cities. I would think that if Travel and Leisure wants to maintain a following in those cities they would refrain from publishing such unsubstantiated, non-factual results.

  9. JP says:

    New York and LA always share this title simply because more tourists and business people travel to both cities and as a result, they get more votes based on volume. The rudest, lowest-class people I’ve ever encountered when traveling on business are in Philadelphia. The suburbs are a different story, but downtown Philly, forget it. If more people encountered the “City of Brotherly Love” they would be at the top of the list.

    1. TommyG says:

      Used to live there. People called it the “City of the Brotherly Shove”.

  10. bruce weston says:

    oh, and obviously the results of this poll weren’t from NY’ers, we are, apparently, too busy…

  11. Jerry says:

    I am a native New Yorker. I was raised in The Bronx my whole life and I still live here. I LOVE New York. I travel when I can and I have not one bad thing to say about any other city or people. I love my teams but I don’t hate any teams from other cities. I hold open doors, I get up for others who need to sit more then me. I say thank you when I get my change. Someone asks me for directions I give it to them as best i can. If I bump into someone I say excuse me. I prefer the subway to driving. I don’t make eye contact with you but if you ask a question I will respond as best as my knowledge can provide an answer. I walk very fast but I DON’T dart into traffic. I know where I’m going, what time I’m expected and how much time it will take me to get there. I walk through the streets of this amazing city daily but the best time is at night or in the rain. New York is pretty in the rain. I love the hustle and bustle, the sounds of conversations from restaurants, the happy tone from pubs, the loud music booming out of clubs, the crazy excited yelling from sports bars, the smell and taste of a hot dog from a cart the taste of a big slice of pizza from a pizzeria, or a gyro while walking down the street or a big pretzel with mustard. You can be a loner yet not really be alone in the Big Apple. I don’t expect anything from anyone. I work for what I have. I am thankful for my blessing and I am hopeful for what tomorrow will bring. I am a native New Yorker and I am not different then the person living next to me.

    1. nycmoveon says:

      It is true, once the wall of Manhattan rudeness is breached, there are beautiful things in New York City such as the sound of hundreds clicking keys in the New York Public Library, or the Tea lounge where I can buy one cup of coffee and write for eight hours straight while plugged into their outlets.

  12. bruce weston says:

    NYC is the friendliest city in the USA. The rude ones are the tourist and bridge and tunnel crowd, with a big emphasis on people from New Jersey, NOT the inhabitants and residents of NYC. If you go up to any NYC resident and ask for directions, they will give you a smile and direct you if they know how. Ask a tourist, see what you get…. and the aggressive walking morons are mostly bridge and tunnelers b/c they have a train to catch.

    1. Ann says:

      I agree

  13. Scott says:

    No way New York deserves this title. Some of the best people in the world live and work in New York. How do I know? I am one of them. I believe a lot of people from around the country and the world mistake a New Yorkers straight-forward attitide and honest remarks to be rude. Truth is, honesty is the best policy. If you are a tourist standing in front of the Empire State Building and you ask a New Yorker “where is the Empire State Building? ?, Wouldn’t you want an honest reply for better or worse? If not, you should be visiting Chicago.

  14. =) says:

    [corrected] new orleans. instead of the tourist gawking at tourist attractions, you have locals gawking at the tourists as if they’ve never seen a 6 foot tall asian model before. that, to me, is much ruder than any thank you-less cab driver in nyc or bum asking for change.

  15. =) says:

    new orleans. instead of gawking at the tourist gawking at tourist attractions, you have locals gawking at the tourists as if they’ve never seen a 6 foot tall asian model before. that, to me, is much ruder than any thank you-less cab driver in nyc or bum asking for change.

    1. nycmoveon says:

      Why, it would be nice to be gawked at for that reason. I guess we live in different worlds.

  16. cygon says:

    One thing NYC’ers like to do is park IN THE MIDDLE of the street. They don’t giveasheet if there is traffic behind them if someone’s dying behind them or even if there is a huge parking spot just in front of them. THey feel like stopping there they will stop and park and socialize or pick something from the 7-11. And you can rot and wait. If you beep or say something or ask them to move , you get the one-finger salute at best or you get the equivalent verbal greeting.l Even my kids know this and they tell me to just not say anything if I know what’s good for me.

    1. bruce weston says:

      nah, those are morons from Jersey.. NYC peeps don’t drive in NYC or don’t own cars at all… those of us who do own cars don’t do Jersey moronic car stunts..

      1. Ann says:

        correct Bruce

      2. nycmoveon says:

        I agree, what’s the point of owning a car in New York. I sold mine before I moved here, and I was so happy to be rid of the beast. And subways, when seats are available, are ten times better than cars. I can read a book a week during subway travel.

    2. keb says:

      totally. This drives me crazy in Inwood.

  17. cygon says:

    I am surprised that NYC only made it as #1 this year. NYC’ers hav always been and will always be the rudest SOBs in the whole world.How could LA even be in competition for that, I don’t know. Even after the wake of 9/11 people in QUeens were even ruder than ever.Maybe Manhattanites got friendlier then but NONONONO, not in QUeens.

    1. Jen says:

      Hey Cy, do you need any help packing? I think you need to move somewhere that is less offensive to your bigoted ways.

      1. nycmoveon says:

        I agree, but not on the bigoted part. How is that person a bigot?

  18. Ann says:

    If you’re looking for people to stop what they are doing and feign interest while listen to your stories of how you got here…New York is not the place. If you are wanting Phony smiles everywhere you look….New York is not the place. If you (which it sounds to me) demand a “please”. “thank you”. “your welcome” from every one you come next to….New York is not the place (mostly cus a lot of people here can’t speak English) New York is not sugar coated. It’s not polished. New York simply is what it is. Like it…great hang out and have a few drinks. Don’t like it…great don’t let the door hit you in the butt on the way out. It will still be here and it will still be the best city in the world.

    1. weston says:

      well said! NY is not sugar coated, yes!

  19. nycmoveon says:

    I moved here in August, and I am a disabled vet with a limp. Sometimes the limp can slow me down considerably. Here are two instances where that almost landed me in major trouble.

    A policeman from the Port Authority was behind me and my leg was bad to the point that I was looking for a place to sit, continuing was not an option. Both my hip and ankle were locking up and each step felt like being stabbed. The officer behind me was yelling at me, “Move! C’mon, keep moving!” and continued this instead of going around me.

    At Penn station on 34th street, an officer shoulder checked me as I was standing just outside a shop, looking at food. It wasn’t a bump, it was a check.

    Standing in line at Target, there are two people, one in front of us in our line, one in another. They were friends and seeing which line was fastest. I had one item. The lady in the other line had a full cart. When it was apparent that my line was shorter, she pulled the cart out and began to force her way past me to join her friend. She went ballistic when I told her she could wait behind, that she being rude.

    I’ve lived in Jacksonville, Florida and Pensacola for years. I’ve visited many cities. I’ve worked in Air Traffic Control, one of the most stressful jobs a person can have, and never have I experienced the selfishness and utter disregard for humanity as I have here. I mean people don’t speak about friendships here, they speak about networking and contacts. It’s kind of sickening.

    Still, I do love this city, and never in my time here have I been refused directions when I’ve asked for them.

    1. cygon says:

      man you must be a masochist

      1. nycmoveon says:

        No, it is just that while people in this city can be rude, I’ve never had so much opportunity in my life. I will say that I have the nicest neighbor a person could ask for.

    2. weston says:

      you should have took your one item and stuck it up her arse

      1. nycmoveon says:

        Yes, that would have landed me in the rudest part of NYC, its judicial system. No thanks, but don’t think that didn’t cross my mind.

    3. keb says:

      I’m so sorry these things have happened to you. It is absolutely an unfortunate reality of living in NYC. I experienced the same kind of impatient rudeness when I was pregnant and was out with my toddler in tow. It was horrible. I’m so sorry.

      1. nycmoveon says:

        That must have been terrifying. Sadly people can get away with anything. I mean, why should jerks fear anyone unless the police see? We can’t knock the teeth they don’t deserve out. Here’s a great example. Someone broke into my apartment and stole my laptops. I called the police and they literally laughed.

        When I asked those police if there had been other robberies in the neighborhood, they said no, smirked and left. Turns out there were, but by the time they realized it, my crime scene was useless as I’d been living in it for two weeks.

        So you see, defend yourself, go to jail. Don’t defend yourself and get robbed and mugged. Welcome to NYC.

  20. Jay Jay says:

    too many non-locals who think they have to be rude and tough to not stand out.

  21. Matthew says:

    I certainly think so, New York is the worst place rudest place, how do I know it? I work outside NEw York, on the way back, as soon as I drive in to NY, I see that I am getting fingered out, cursed out and pushed out of the way. that’s when I know I am in NY.

    1. Jen says:

      really? you drive through it? Yeah cus NOWHERE else in the country does road rage occur. Just do New Yorkers a favor and keep driving. by all means don’t stop to talk to anyone before you pass judgement. This is what’s wrong with our country. People who have little to no knowledge interjecting uninformed opinions.

      1. cygon says:

        Jen you just proved Matthew’s point

        1. Jen says:

          So it’s ok by you Cy that someone judges an ENTIRE city FULL of different people without even talking to them? That has a name you know. It’s called bigot. But I guess his bigotry is ok with you. Just don’t give you two bigots the figure when you’re driving is that it? Got it, bigot. Thanks for the heads up.

        2. Fred says:

          This whole poll is foolish and opinionated. It’s truly not worth time of any form. Who judged this? Who was polled? When was this conducted? What were the parameters? How was this poll advertized? All results are then therefore skewed. And who really cars if one city is ruder then others. Rudeness is subjective depending on the reign of the world you are in. For example, taking something handed to you in India with your left hand is considered the HEIGHT of rudeness. I can imaging that the judgement of entire cities of people as rude may seem very rude to the people of those cities. I would think that if Travel and Leisure wants to maintain a following in those cities they would refrain from publishing such unsubstantiated, non-factual results.

    2. weston says:

      you must really be an asshole if every time you come back here you get fingered out, cursed out and pushed out of the way… just sayin…

      1. Jen says:

        LMAO Weston totally what I was thinking.

  22. Johan says:

    Pleeease!! Get back to work!!
    -NYC worker…

  23. Nikki says:

    Don’t believ everything you read. I’ve lived in New York my entire life; and so far it was a pretty good one. There ARE some people who wont say excuse me or sorry if they bump into you somewhere, most of them are tourist who think thats the way they’re souposed to act; or aggrivated people who’ve had a rough day (YOU try to get to work on “Christmas Holidays”. See how jolly you’d stay walking behind people gwaking at every little thing).
    Enough of my ramblings… if you ever get a chance to visit the city sometime where there arent any holidays and isn’t summer, or some big music thing is happening, I can assure you, you’ll have a good time, and now that I think about it… it’s probablysimilar to that in Miami or D.C. too.

  24. numberoneclerk says:

    Unfortunately, as a native New Yorker, I would tend to agree. In my travels to other parts of the country people are much nicer, more courteous, etc.

  25. Andy Maker says:

    A basic rule of a thumb in NYC is that if you have to ride a subway, you are a looser, and just by being rude to others, you’ve got nothing to loose, and you hope rudeness will get you on TV or somewhere better then where you are

    1. John says:

      yeah…no…not even close. No REAL New Yorkers feels snobbish about the subways AT ALL. We prefer them to driving in the city. Spoken like a typical non-New Yorker who thinks they get it when they really don’t.

    2. weston says:

      basic rule of thumb be a ‘looser’ if you take a subway?! please remove head from ass before making stupid comments. that has got to be the funniest babble i’ve read in a while.

  26. Thomas says:

    When every persons it is you run into in NYC has their hand out for a tip…you find it rude! And if you chose not to tip them and they run a tirade of swear words at you..it is rude!!

  27. Thomas says:

    San Francisco? Not!!

  28. Jam says:

    I definitely believe this article was posted because of stereotypical agenda from ignorant people .. nyc rude? … c’mon .. i been in nyc for 20yrs … and what some people say they encountered in a few days .. i haven’t in 20yrs!!!

    1. Jamie says:

      exactly

    2. cygon says:

      Maybe you don’t go out of your close-knit ethnic neighborhood too much in those 20 years. I lived here for 16 years and I’ve seen too much. Does not even look like a civilized nation most times. and this is a “good” neighborhood.

      1. Jen says:

        WOW you really are a bigot. “ethnic neighborhood”?! really??? got your number pal.

  29. Just an average new yorker says:

    Just an average new yorker

    Wow I love how tourists would come to New York with the conception that everyone here is rude and aggressive.

    I guarantee you if go to many Southern states like Atlanta, if you’re not white, you’re in for it.

    Anyways back to my point.

    The tourists have to realize that they have a self-serving bias when it comes to approaching New Yorkers. Yes, they might be in a rush and frustrated but if you approach them expecting rudeness, that is what you’re going to receive. The tourist might not realize it but if they are being passive-aggressive, they will risk sending mixed signals to the average New Yorker.

    Besides the point, New York has a large population condensed in a small area, so there are bound to be tremendous assholes every now and then. I’m not going to sugar coat it and say New Yorkers are the kindest and sweetest people in the world, as many other replies have mentioned but it is unfair to generalize the whole population of the city based on a couple of incidents.

    On that note, pain is often more memorable than pleasure so the next time you snarf at New Yorkers as being rude because of one incident here and there, try to remember all the people who get up on the subway for the elderly, pregnant women and those who are disabled. Those people who will wait for you at the end of the hallway whist holding a door just so you won’t have to battle the air compressor locking mechanism on the door. The thank yous that strangers will give you for holding a door for them and many more.

    Thanks for reading🙂

    I obviously pressed the wrong button and replied to someone’s comment lol. Sorry

    1. nycmoveon says:

      No, if you are in Atlanta and you ARE white, you’re in for it. Have you ever been there?

  30. Al Tyus says:

    I think it’s unfair to compare New York to most other American cities as New Yorkers are forced to interact with each other much more frequently. It’s not an inherent rudeness or temperament but the frequency in which New Yorkers are in close quarters with one another which increases the sample size. Suburbanites and smaller city dweller’s can be just as rude but the manifestation of their rudeness is often veiled by the 2 cars in between them.

  31. Pedro Ford says:

    I don’t agree NYC is a rude city, on the contrary, my opinion is that NYC is a Teddy bear city in comparison with Miami, for example.

  32. PL says:

    Who cares what they think of us…

  33. Angel says:

    I’m from San Antonio- then moved to the Bay Area for seven years- I’m now in the east coast- and have always found NYC to be friendly- I felt more welcomed in one day then I did in the Bay Area. People are busy and more abrasive but don’t mistake that for being rude. People stopped to ask if I needed directions- they were helpful and welcoming. As an east coaster- I have no desire to leave NYC. .

  34. Joshua Perez says:

    Im from New Jersey and I travel often to NYC. The people in NYC are RUDE as HELL. Im from Jersey and I chilll in the city very often, but it dosent matter to me, but NYers are NOT the friendliest people in the world. Not to mention, the employees from the George Washington Bridge, Holland or Lincoln Tunnel. The employees dont even make eye contact. No smile, and dont even say a word for that matter. I remember paying toll at the Lincoln Tunnel, where the employee looked MISERABLE. She made no eye contact whatsoever, and i had to practically get out of my car to reach out to pay my toll, cause she did not move an inch towards my money. When I awaited for my change, she simply streched her arm out and assuming I grabbed my changed she simply let it go. My change was blown away by the wind for that matter, and there was nothing I can do. She looked at me as if it didnt concern her. Since that time, and many times I cross the bridges to get to the city, I get a very sour taste from the employees that work there. Sadly but true. I feel sorry for the tourist and those that come from afar. The impression they get from New Yorkers are definitely NOT a good one. I speak for myself and from experiences, NYers are def. not friendly. My Best Friend who travels from Puerto Rico very often, even stated, ” These people from New York are Rude and Obnogtious!” He even indicated he would never come back to visit. Im glad someone noticed this and Im glad that it was brought out finally to the open for everyone to opiniate!! I thought It was me.

    1. weston says:

      spoken like someone from Jersey! Yes, it’s definitely the toll booths fault for you not getting close enough. Those damn toll booths!! You have the highest car insurance rates for a reason, YOU JERSEY FOLKS CAN’T DRIVE!

  35. blikkem says:

    I agree, NYC is a very rude city. No excuses about being in a rush. That’s what makes you rude, where you are going is more important then anyone else around you, that’s rude to me. Old ladies pushing me out of the way to get to a seat on the subway. Not one stranger has ever said hi to me in the street, even in the office I work, there are people who only say hello to management. They talk about race discrimination in some places, NYC has big time class discrimination and people buy into it trying to be better then someone. Has anyone tried driving in this city. If there is space, doesn’t matter if it’s a parking lane or enough room in a one lane road someone will try to race past you. All my New York bread friends I’ve brought home to the city I grew up always say “people are so nice here” usually after we’ve been shopping. That’s gotta tell you something. NYer’s live in their own world and judge everything from where they sit. They talk about themselves incessantly. Lots of people trying prove something in one way or another, most of the time to strangers. Rude tourists in Times Square? There’s no place space to walk and all the tourists are look up, of course you are going to get bumped, so NY to think someone else is rude all the time.

  36. Lauren says:

    New Yorkers aren’t rude, we just have different ideas about what constitutes politeness. For example, tourists stopping to ask directions at 8:59am in Times Square might think New Yorkers are being rude by not stopping to answer them. But the New Yorker thinks the tourist is rude for having the nerve to stop them in the middle of their commute through midtown. Different priorities.

  37. Rina says:

    I have lived in different big cities in 3 different continents, including New York City. I have to agree that NYC is the rudest city in the U.S. and might as well rank high worldwide. The main reason and worst excuse: ALWAYS IN A HURRY!!! It seems like a lot of NYers have no idea what manners and courtesy are: no “excuse me”, and much less “i’m sorry” (considering you can say both of them on-the-go).
    However, I have also come to realize that NYers are really helpful people, but than again helpfulness has nothing to do with manners….

    1. Joshua Perez says:

      wow.. WELL SAID.. .I agree!

      1. Jen says:

        yeah well said too bad what was well said isn’t correct. And correct me if I’m wrong but isn’t making judgements toward people you don’t really know considered TOTALLY rude??? If that’s the case Rina and many others on this board are far worse then the New Yorkers they are judging.

    2. weston says:

      peeps who don’t say ‘excuse me’ or ‘i’m sorry’ aren’t from NYC, unfortunately, unless you ask everyone who does such, there’s no way to prove it… and just because some jerk transplant from elsewhere says they’re in a hurry, doesn’t make them a NY’er, in fact, it just proves they aren’t…

  38. hidehidehideho says:

    They definitely got it right!

  39. CT says:

    This article must be written for people in Savannah and Charleston, because they have time for such things. New Yorkers got to keep moving…..

  40. John M says:

    NYers aren’t rude. They know what they want and they’re direct about getting it. That’s not rude, it’s honest. The rudest city in America is San Francisco – by far. Very nasty people live there. I’m sure they’re even nastier after last weekend.

  41. Tony P. Ona says:

    I lived in New York City for 3 years in 3 different bouroughs, Manhattan, Brooklyn and Queens and I found NYC people to be nice and courteous in general though it’s not perfect like any other place. I love walking in it’s wide broad avenues especially Manhattan. I take the train Metro North from Connecticut to Grand Central every now and then. I’m retired and visit New York every now and then. I love New York – it fascinates and make me happy.

  42. Ralph says:

    Wow, people just don’t get it. New Yorkers are the nicest people on the planet. The problem is, as a New Yorker we have to first figure out what your angle is (cause most people have an angles, sorry that’s the world we live in). Once we deem a person to be sincere no one (let me say it again) NO ONE is more helpful than a true New Yorker. Whether your lost or need any help, if you’re in NY you’ll get it. If 9-11 proved anything to the world, it was that New Yorkers come together. I know the rest of Amercia was there for us, but we were here and lived it first.

  43. NY NOOB...So True says:

    I moved to New York about 2 months ago and this is definitely true. I grow up in rural VA and worked in the Baltimore/D.C. area for the past year. New York is nothing like any other place. People can be polite and people can be the rudest. Drivers..horrible. Customer service… don’t exist. Example: In a hospital and a foreign female in her 20’s was pushing her elderly family member out of the elevator and accidentally bumped a lady coming into the elevator with the wheelchair. The lady cursed out the girl telling her to go back to her country. Instead of just waiting to get on the elevator. That type of stuff can happen anywhere, but in NY that probably happens everyday.

  44. George says:

    Just last week another publication released a poll naming Philadelphia the rudest city. I gues my point is these pols are really stupid and pointless. I hope that wasn’t rude…

    1. nobody says:

      critics and opinions are like assholes, they all stink

  45. Jay Patel says:

    I think NYC is a great and people here are nice (and smart). What about Detroit??? I thought it was a mean city too???? or u just mad that the giants are going to superbowl!!!

    1. conky says:

      places lie detroit or newark new jersey are not really cities, but war zones.

  46. KatieG says:

    I’m from Los Angeles and have lived in NYC for just over a year, and I can tell you, LA is much worse. People, no matter where you go in LA, are so into themselves, they cant be bothered to give you the time of day! While here in NYC you can start a conversation with just about anyone! It’s a very open city, and I love that. People may be busy here, but they are certainly friendlier than my “laid back” home city.

    1. conky says:

      are all of those beach towns like santa monica considered la? because the beach towns there are amazing. i went into downtown la, the business district area during the middle of the day in the middle of the week, and it was like a ghost town. we never went out of our way to visit long beach or compton.

  47. conky says:

    as a resident of nj, i find nyc to be the most over priced, over rated place to visit in america. not only are the people rude, but it’s dirty as hell, smells like garbage and bodily fluids everywhere you go. now they charge you 12 bucks to cross a bridge or tunnel to that cesspool. 20 bucks to cross the verazano bridge. then you pay 50 bucks for parking. i recommend nyc if you are from the backwoods and you want to see nice architecture which i admit is amazing, and there are a few nice museums and zoos that are moderately priced. most of the broadway shows are garbage and are way over priced, and have uncomfortable seating. i guess it’s an ok place to see once in your life if you want to see a human zoo.

    1. KatieG says:

      Sounds like someone had a bad experience in NYC!

    2. Lauren says:

      Why on earth would you drive into NYC? Take the train like the rest of us.

    3. Ann says:

      Jersey….enough said…..I’m guessing your trip up to the big Apple doesn’t take you through Elizabeth NJ??? And you got some nerve bringing up smells when you got a town that smells like that, LOL.

    4. weston says:

      thank you for proving how retarded people from Jersey are! Great job, really! First off, you’re a doosh if you drive into NYC. The smell you bitch of comes from the uncool side of the river, the toxic wasteland called Jersey (you drink the tap water there? – I didn’t think so). While some may think it’s expensive to take a tunnel into NYC, it’s only half that as most likely you’ll be leaving and we’re smart enough to make one toll with all you doosh jersey drivers coming into NYC on a daily basis. They should make it more money for the tolls so you jersey dooshbags stay in jersey.. you are all the worst drivers in the USA – your highest insurance rates PROVE this

  48. Age Old Wisdom says:

    The world is full of rude people, but not people like me. Everyone needs to learn how to drive better behind the wheel like I do. I’m sure glad I’m not one of all these wierd people in this world who talk funny and act strange. The moral of the story from this article is to never blindly believe what you read in the news (unless of course it validates a prejudice or reinforces a stereotype)

  49. conky says:

    as a resident of nj, i find nyc to be the most over priced, over rated place to visit in america. not only are the people rude, but it’s dirty as hell, smells like garbage and bodily fluids everywhere you go. now they charge you 12 bucks to cross a bridge or tunnel to that cesspool. 20 bucks to cross the verrazano bridge. then you pay 50 bucks for parking. i recommend nyc if you are from the backwoods and you want to see nice architecture which i admit is amazing, and there are a few nice museums and zoos that are moderately priced. most of the broadway shows are garbage and are way over priced, and have uncomfortable seating. i guess it’s an ok place to see once in your life if you want to see a human zoo.

    1. Ann says:

      Jersey…enough said…..I’m guessing your trip up to the big Apple doesn’t take you through Elizabeth NJ??? And you got some nerve bringing up smells when you got a town that smells like that, LOL.

    2. weston says:

      fascist, report my comment? that’s cencsorship, which is NOT American, oh, but you’re from Jersey, so you really don’t count. OR know how to drive, please don’t cross a bridge to the cool side of the river ever again…

  50. Omar Dengo says:

    I’m a Costa Rican citizen who visits NYC more or less once a year. NYC is a very friendly place. People are generally courteous and you always find someone willing to be helpful.Yes, once in a while, you may bump into some rude “not-well-upstairs” jerk, but that’s not the norm. That most people are in a hurry to get to their jobs or carry out their business may be something many outsiders don’t understand. Example: if a clerk at some deli or salad-or-pizza-to-take joint makes a point out some customer not hurrying up to make up his or her’s order, the clerk is just being courteous with those waiting behind; it’s the undecided customer the one who’s being rude by delaying others. NYC: my favorite place to be!!!

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