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Court Hears Appeal For Pakistani Scientist Who Shot At U.S. Soldiers

This undated FBI handout photo shows Aafia Siddiqui, a Pakistani woman who at one time studied at the Massachusetts Institute of Technology. U.S. Homeland Security Secretary Tom Ridge announced on May 26, 2004 that Siddiqui is being pursued by the FBI for questioning about possible contacts with al-Qaida. (credit: FBI via Getty Images)

This undated FBI handout photo shows Aafia Siddiqui, a Pakistani woman who at one time studied at the Massachusetts Institute of Technology. U.S. Homeland Security Secretary Tom Ridge announced on May 26, 2004 that Siddiqui is being pursued by the FBI for questioning about possible contacts with al-Qaida. (credit: FBI via Getty Images)

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NEW YORK (CBSNewYork/AP) — Lawyers for a Pakistani scientist serving an 86-year prison sentence for shooting at U.S. soldiers in Afghanistan say she should have been barred from testifying due to mental illness.

The arguments were made Friday before the 2nd U.S. Circuit Court of Appeals in Manhattan.

Aafia Siddiqui was once a bright young student at the Massachusetts Institute of Technology and Brandeis University. She was branded a fugitive terror suspect after she left the U.S. in 2003 and married a nephew of the 9/11 master planner.

She was detained in Afghanistan in 2008. A day later, she was wounded during a confrontation with U.S. authorities who had gone to interrogate her. Six witnesses testified that she had grabbed a rifle and fired at the Americans.

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