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Brooklyn Gym Offers Cyr Wheel Classes; Performers Tout Art Form As Core-Engaging Workout

If You're Willing To Endure Some Bumps & Bruises, You're Bound To Spin Heads
Cyr Wheel performers in Brooklyn. (credit: CBS 2)

Cyr Wheel performers in Brooklyn. (credit: CBS 2)

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NEW YORK (CBSNewYork) — “Spinning your wheels” typically means getting no work done, but in Brooklyn it means getting a great workout.

Since its creation in 2003, the aerobatic art form known as the Cyr wheel has been featured in the 2006 Winter Olympics, the Britney Spears Circus Tour and several Cirque du Soleil shows.

Once reserved for top-notch circus performers, the Cyr wheel is now easily accessible to all thanks to a class in Brooklyn.

Cyr wheel classes are offered by the Streb Gym in Williamsburg. One session lasts 90 minutes and costs $35.

Performers said it also doubles as a core-engaging workout.

“I don’t even go to the gym anymore. I think this thing is a fantastic way to work out the entire body utilizing your core, legs, arms,” Harold Moeller told CBS 2′s Alex Denis.

The Cyr wheel consists of several parts, that when bolted together, create a large, metal hoop that can weigh anywhere from 20 to 40 pounds depending on size.

A custom-made Cyr wheel can cost about $1,500. If you’re not quite ready to put forth that investment, head to class anyway and you’ll be provided with a wheel at no additional cost.

So, what does it take to master the art form?

“The most important thing is just balance,” performer Randy Kato.

No one knows that better than, Michael Bauer. For the past four months, he’s taken Cyr wheel classes and admits he’s endured bumps, bruises and even a sprained ankle during the process.

“That split second as you fall, you’re going to learn that much more. You’re going to say, ‘Oh next time I was falling, but if I go a little bit this way, I can get around,’” Bauer said.

There are no handles, so performers have to move their hands fast when the section they’re holding hits the ground.

If you’re willing to endure some initial injuries, instructors and students alike agree, your spins are bound to turn heads.

Do you think you would give it a try?  Share your thoughts in the comments section below…