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Cabbies Demand Express Lane For Fueling Up, Complain Of Long Daily Waits

NYS Federation Of Taxi Drivers: 'We Should Be Considered Emergency Vehicles'
Gas Station Line

Lines at gas stations were going nowhere Sunday. (Credit: CBS 2)

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Superstorm Sandy

NEW YORK (CBSNewYork) — On Monday night, New York City cabbies were demanding an express lane at local gas stations, as they complained of waiting up to six hours a day to refuel.

The New York State Federation of Taxi Drivers in a news release called on Gov. Andrew Cuomo to have trucks provide gas directly to taxis in all five boroughs of New York City.

“We are transporting seniors to hospitals, children and teachers to schools, and men and women to work, yet we must wait on a single file line to gas up,” federation spokesman Fernando Mateo said in the release. “We should be considered emergency vehicles during this crisis left behind by Sandy. Thousands of cab drivers have parked their cars and called it quits until gas is readily available.”

Yellow cab and livery drivers said they deserved to get gasoline, as driving a motor vehicle is their job.

“We deserve to get gasoline,” the federation said in the release. “We have worked day and night, extra hours to assist without charging an extra dime.”

The cab drivers planned to hold a rally at 2 p.m. Tuesday at the BP station at 186th Street and Broadway in Washington Heights calling on Gov. Cuomo to assist them.

Motorists throughout the Tri-State Area continued to face long lines at gas stations Monday, a full seven days after Superstorm Sandy hit.

But CBS 2’s Lou Young reported that sources said gas product has begun moving from previously damaged fuel terminals and powerless gas stations, which is good news for people like Eddie Hoyotsyan from Sunnyside.

“Yesterday I was at Greenpoint and I waited for thrity hours and the tanker never came, so now I’m down to one gallon. I got no choice but to be here on foot. I got no choice,” he said.

For displaced storm victims fuel means mobility, being unable to fill up adds insult to injury.

“I’m from Long Island, Massapequa. There’s no power. I came to stay with a buddy all week. I just want to get back soon hopefully, but I’ll need gas to do that,” said Mike Sarra.

For many of these drivers waiting for gas to arrive is the only option.

Do you think cabbies should have an express lane to fuel up? Tell us below…