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Brooklyn’s Largest Housing Project Remains Without Heat, Power

Tenant: 'They Keep Promising 'Oh We're Going To Do Something'...Nothing's Done'
Public Housing After Sandy

Personnel from Mayor Michael Bloomberg’s office deliver food to the Red Hook public housing project on Nov. 3 in Brooklyn. (credit: John Moore/Getty Images)

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Superstorm Sandy

NEW YORK (CBSNewYork) – Residents of Brooklyn’s largest public housing complex are still living without heat and power two weeks after superstorm Sandy socked the Tri-State Area.

Last week, the 14-story buildings of the Red Hook Houses reeked of rotting trash and mold, WCBS 880’s Alex Silverman reported.

WCBS 880’s Alex Silverman reports

The halls were pitch black and some residents lived in fear following reports of rapes, Silverman reported.

Many of the problems persist but there are some signs of progress, Silverman reported.

The stench has subsided but the hallways and apartments remain in the dark.

“Last night while I was asleep, I jumped up because the picture frame fell because this whole wall was soaked,” one tenant told Silverman. “It’s raining in here.”

Many of the tenants Silverman spoke to said water continues to pour into their homes.

“Mine is soaking wet and I fell down the steps the day before yesterday because the stairwell was soaking wet,” a woman said.

The flooding has left mold in many apartments.

“I’ve worked so hard for this for my son and this is what it’s starting to look like,” a woman told Silverman

Residents also complained of newfound health problems from the aftermath of Sandy.

“I was diagnosed now with asthma. I’ve never had asthma in my life,” a woman told Silverman.

“I smoke cigarettes now because of this whole situation,” another tenant told Silverman.

A crew was out front Monday working to get a temporary boiler up and running to finally get the residents heat.

“Most probably tonight midnight it should be ready,” a worker told Silverman.

“They keep promising ‘oh we’re going to do something, we’re going to do something.’ Nothing’s done,” another resident complained.

On Sunday, the vice chair of the New York City Housing Authority announced public housing residents impacted by Sandy will get a break in their rent.

More than 850 people live in the Red Hook Houses, according to the NYCHA website.

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