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The New ‘Tebowing': ‘Kaepernicking’ Craze Takes Off After 49ers Win

(credit: Harry How/Getty Images)

(credit: Harry How/Getty Images)

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NEW YORK (CBSNewYork/AP) – Forget Tebowing.

Bradying? So 2012.

Kaepernicking is all the craze now.

In the wake of San Francisco’s 45-31 victory over the Green Bay Packers in Saturday night’s NFC divisional playoff, 49ers quarterback Colin Kaepernick’s touchdown celebration of flexing his right arm and kissing his bicep has taken off on social media.

Several 49ers fans have posted pictures of themselves in the act at home, in bars, on the street, at work or just about any other place they frequent. Some even positioned their toddlers or dogs in the position. Others made online videos.

Kaepernicking had started weeks ago after the quarterback replaced Alex Smith, though the act has increased during San Francisco’s run to the NFC title game against Atlanta. Kaepernick has often retweeted other fans’ pictures of the act on Twitter.

Tebowmania? His breakout 2011 season seems like it was ages ago.

Tebow, a dedicated Christian, had kneeled down in prayer following scores during Denver’s improbable run to the playoffs last year. He faded with the New York Jets this season, and so did Tebowing.

Bradying, a dejected sitting pose which mocked New England Patriots quarterback Tom Brady, caught on after last year’s Super Bowl.

(credit: Twitter/@mjsteinbach)

(credit: Twitter/@mjsteinbach)

(TM and © Copyright 2013 CBS Radio Inc. and its relevant subsidiaries. CBS RADIO and EYE Logo TM and Copyright 2013 CBS Broadcasting Inc. Used under license. All Rights Reserved. This material may not be published, broadcast, rewritten, or redistributed. The Associated Press contributed to this report.)