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Seen At 11: Myriad Of Bank Fees Draw Consumer Complaints

A bank teller displays $100 bills (file/credit: Oscar Siagian/AFP/GettyImages)

A bank teller displays $100 bills (file/credit: Oscar Siagian/AFP/GettyImages)

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NEW YORK (CBSNewYork) — When it comes to banking, over-the-top fees are a top consumer complaint, with the amount varying from bank to bank.

But now, as CBS 2’s Maurice DuBois reported Wednesday night, there are new charges to be on the lookout for in the fee trap.

Among the new fees popping up at banks everywhere include a $5 key to replace a missing debit card or a $20 fee if you want it rushed. There may also be a charge to deal with a human teller.

And if you want to avoid charges from out-of-network ATMs, your bank can arrange that – for a $25 monthly fee.

“I just said, ‘Is it April Fools, or what’s going on?’” said bank customer Dave Alexander. “They said, ‘No, that’s, you know, recent bank policy.'”

Alexander is not the only one fed up with fees. The growing number of bank fees has turned into a major consumer complaint.

“There’s all different kinds of little fees and every bank is a little bit different,” said Claes Bell of Bankrate.com. “Some of these fees are being put forward by big national banks; some of them are small banks and credit unions.”

Some other new bank fees include a $1 a month fee to go straight to the front of the phone line, skipping other callers on hold. And if you want an ATM statement printout, it could cost another $1.

“Banks are really struggling to find ways to make money off their checking deposits, so they’re experimenting with new things,” Bell said.

The American Bankers Association said banks will continue to look for ways to charge customers, to cover the cost of administering checking accounts.

“Some consultants estimate its between $250 and $300 a year, and those costs have to be recovered,” said Nessa Feddis of the association. “And the costs aren’t just for providing statements and processing transactions. It’s also for preventing fraud, protecting privacy.”

The association also pointed out that 59 percent of consumers pay no bank fees at all.

Experts said if you don’t like the fees at your bank, shop around and find a new place to put your money. But check with your bank, as there are some that may hit you with a fee if you close an account within six months of opening it.

“Enough is enough,” Alexander said. “I just won’t be nickeled and dimed to death.”

Banks said they disclose all their fees in documents you receive when you get an account, and in disclosures that show up in the mail.

Have you been hit with unwelcome bank fees? Leave your comments below…