News

Law Enforcement Finally Tracks Down, Captures Boston Marathon Bombing Suspect (page 4)

Police Find Bloody 19-Year-Old Dzhokhar Tsarnaev Hiding In A Boat In A Yard
Dzhokhar Tsarnaev being arrested and treated by law enforcement authorities. (credit: Handout)

Dzhokhar Tsarnaev being arrested and treated by law enforcement authorities. (credit: Handout)

Marathon Bombings

The Federal Aviation Administration had also imposed temporary flight restrictions in the Boston area. Logan International Airport remained open, but operated under heightened security.

As officers fanned out across the Boston area, Bryce Acosta, 24, came out of his Cambridge home with his hands up.

“I had like 30 FBI guys come storm my house with assault rifles,” he said.  They yelled, “Is anybody in there?” and began searching his house and an adjacent shed, leaving after about 10 minutes.

A young woman named Jessica Brusarge, who was visiting a friend in Watertown on Thursday night, said she was stopped by a law enforcement officer with an assault rifle.

She said he told her, “There’s a foot pursuit coming this way so I want to be in between you and that.”

“I was scared,” she said.

Congressman: Suspects Had Cache Of Explosives

The senior Democrat on the House Intelligence Committee said the two suspects had collected pipe bombs, grenades and improvised explosive devices before they confronted police.

Congressman Dutch Ruppersberger said, “They clearly amassed a small arsenal of explosives.”

Ruppersberger, who was briefed by authorities, said U.S. law enforcement and intelligence officials plan to quickly pivot from their search for the surviving suspect to learn whether the brothers had any help or contact from terrorist groups inside or outside the U.S.

CBS News’ Miller also reported that the FBI found explosives, pipe bombs with fuses and some sort of synthetic powder inside Tamerlan Tsarnaev’s apartment on Norfolk Street in Cambridge.

FBI evidence response teams were seen going in and out of the house, which neighbors said contained three separate living units, WBZ reported.

Suspects Of Chechnyan Origin

The suspects were identified by law enforcement officials and family members as ethnic Chechen brothers from Dagestan, which neighbors Chechnya in southern Russia. They lived near Boston and had been in the U.S. for about a decade after receiving asylum, an uncle said.

A law enforcement source told CBS News that Dzhokhar Tsarvaev became an American citizen on Sept. 11, 2012. He arrived in the U.S. on a tourist visa in April 2002 and sought asylum in September of that year.

There was no immediate word on whether Tamerlan was an American citizen.

Dzhokhar was registered as a student at the University of Massachusetts-Dartmouth and lived in a dormitory there, according to other students. Students there said he was on campus this week after the bombings.

Relatives Of Bombing Suspects React

The uncle of the bombing suspects, Ruslan Tsarni, said he was “absolutely shocked” at the news and called the older brother a “loser.”

“I just wished they never existed,” Tsarni said. “I’m wordless.”

Speaking to reporters outside his home in Montgomery Village, Md., he said the family was “ashamed” and urged his nephew to surrender.

Alvi Tsarni, another uncle of the suspects, told CBS News he, too, was shocked about learning news of his nephews.

“It’s not possible. My nephews can’t do this stuff. There’s no way,” he said.

Their father, Anzor Tsarnaev, said in a telephone interview with The Associated Press from the Russian city of Makhachkala that his younger son, Dzhokhar, is “a true angel.”

“Dzhokhar is a second-year medical student in the U.S. He is such an intelligent boy. We expected him to come on holidays here,”  the father said.

“They were set up, they were set up!” he exclaimed. “I saw it on television; they killed my older son Tamerlan.”

Anzor Tsarnaev, badly agitated, gave little more information and ended the call angrily, saying, “Leave me alone, my son’s been killed.”

Read More About The Boston Marathon Bombings:

(TM and © Copyright 2013 CBS Radio Inc. and its relevant subsidiaries. CBS RADIO and EYE Logo TM and Copyright 2013 CBS Broadcasting Inc. Used under license. All Rights Reserved. This material may not be published, broadcast, rewritten, or redistributed. The Associated Press contributed to this report.)