CBS2-Header-Logo WFAN 1010WINS WCBS tiny WLNYLogo

News

Chappaqua Residents Seek Solutions In The Wake Of Coyote Attacks

Coyotes Have Been Assaulting, Sometimes Eating Small Dogs
Coyote Meeting

Residents of Chappaqua discuss a recent spate of attacks on small dogs by coyotes. (Credit: Holli Haerr/1010 WINS)

TRI-STATE NEWS HEADLINES

From our newsroom to your inbox weekday mornings at 9AM.
Sign Up

CHAPPAQUA, N.Y. (CBSNewYork) — Following a recent rash of attacks on small dogs by coyotes, residents gathered Wednesday for a meeting to discuss the problem and come up with solutions.

As 1010 WINS’ Holli Haerr reported, several dozen people came to the meeting at the New Castle Town Hall to learn all about coyotes. Among the attendees was Paula Bernard, whose dog was killed by one almost two years ago.

“We had an invisible fence and a Westie, 14 1/2 years old, 20 pounds, and he was somebody’s dinner,” Bernard said.

Bernard was not the only one at the meeting who has lost a pet, but different people said they have different ideas of what should be done.

“I feel that the state needs to come in and control the population,” one woman said. Another said it should be the responsibility of the town.

A Department of Environmental Control official and an animal advocate recommended high fences – not invisible ones. They also said people should haze coyotes – throw rocks and bang pots and pans – to scare them away.

CBS 2’s Lou Young reported Tuesday that a coyote den likely has been established in Chappaqua, and its members consider other canines to be competition – and occasionally food.

“They’re having they’re pups; they’re getting a little more protective of their territories,” said animal trapper Jim Horton. “You know you leave you little Fluffy out in the yard and they’re going to take advantage.”

That was what presumably happened to a miniature golden poodle named “Ruby” on May 5 — a yelp, sudden rustling, and dead silence.

“There was no sign of her,” said dog owner Griffen Dresner. “One moment she was there, the next moment she was just gone.”

The experts told CBS 2 this happens when coyotes are allowed to get too comfortable in a residential area, when humans are too passive or friendly. It already has happened in Greenwich and Rye Brook in recent years, and this year, it’s Chappaqua’s turn.

“It’s more territorial conflict, but we’ve found carcasses of dogs — little dogs — all chewed up,” Horton said. “They eat them.”

You May Also Be Interested In These Stories: