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Biogenesis Investor Claims A-Rod Summoned Bosch To Detroit During ALCS

Porter Fischer Calls MLB Brass 'The Biggest Scumbags On Earth'
A-Rod stretches during batting practice before Game 4 of the ALCS at Comerica Park on October 18, 2012 in Detroit, Michigan. (Photo by Jonathan Daniel/Getty Images)

A-Rod stretches during batting practice before Game 4 of the ALCS at Comerica Park on October 18, 2012 in Detroit, Michigan. (Photo by Jonathan Daniel/Getty Images)

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NEW YORK (CBSNewYork) — Biogenesis founder Anthony Bosch has agreed to speak with MLB investigators. Meanwhile, one of Bosch’s former business associates has broken his silence — in a public way — as baseball’s performance-enhancing drugs probe chugs along.

According to a former investor and marketing guru at the now-closed Florida anti-aging clinic, Yankees slugger Alex Rodriguez called Bosch to Detroit during last year’s ALCS to help him fix his swing.

“I said, ‘Hey, how was the trip? Where’s my money?'” Porter Fischer told the Miami New Times, describing his falling out with the Biogenesis operator. “Bosch looked me straight in the face and said, ‘I don’t have it. You’re not going to get it. I’m Tony Bosch. What the hell are you going to do about it?'”

In January, the New Times reported that multiple baseball players’ names — including A-Rod’s — appeared in the hand-written records of the alleged PED-peddling clinic. Milwaukee Brewers star Ryan Braun, Yankees catcher Francisco Cervelli and others have since been linked to Biogenesis. All have denied the accusations as MLB reportedly seeks to hand down lengthy suspensions.

Rodriguez had a nightmarish 2012 postseason. He was eventually benched and went only 1-for-9 in the ALCS, which was swept by the Tigers.

The team “had no knowledge of Bosch traveling to Detroit,” according to the New York Daily News.

Fischer also claimed that MLB paid him $5,000 for clinic documents, according to the New Times.

“He sought to be compensated for his information and documents,” MLB spokesman Patrick Courtney told the New Times. “We were unable to reach an agreement. Since we became aware of the Biogenesis allegations, we have pursued every legal avenue to enforce our drug program.”

Fischer was the former employee who leaked the explosive records from Biogenesis in January, the New Times reported, adding that he was angry with Bosch over a financial dispute.

Fischer met with league investigators but wasn’t “particularly helpful,” according to ESPN.

“The people running Major League Baseball are the biggest scumbags on Earth as far as I’m concerned,” Fischer told the New Times. “At this point, every bad guy out there knows exactly who I am. Why shouldn’t everyone else know the story too?”

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