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Elected Officials Urge People Not To Forget About Those Still Recovering From Sandy

Scott Stringer In Breezy Point: 'The Truth Is, The Job Here Is Not Done'
The remains of Breezy Point, Queens as seen from Chopper 880 following superstorm Sandy - Nov. 2, 2012 (credit: Tom Kaminski/WCBS 880)/Breezy Point as seen from Chopper 880 on Oct. 21, 2013 (credit: Tom Kaminski/WCBS 880)

The remains of Breezy Point, Queens as seen from Chopper 880 following superstorm Sandy – Nov. 2, 2012 (credit: Tom Kaminski/WCBS 880)/Breezy Point as seen from Chopper 880 on Oct. 21, 2013 (credit: Tom Kaminski/WCBS 880)

Superstorm Sandy

NEW YORK (CBSNewYork)The first anniversary of superstorm Sandy has come and gone, but the rebuilding continues.

Speaking from Breezy Point, which was destroyed by flooding and fire, New York State Assemblyman Phil Goldfeder said it’s important to remember that people are still struggling.

“Construction crews are still going to be working and our families in this community and communities in Broad Channel and Howard Beach and Hamilton Beach are still going to need help,” Goldfeder told reporters including WCBS 880’s Jim Smith.

Nearly 130 homes burned to the ground in Breezy Point during the storm. Residents spent the anniversary planting sea grass on sand dunes in an effort to prevent similar damage in the future.

“Don’t forget that our communities are still suffering,” said Goldfeder. “And I urge everybody to continue to stay involved in the recovery.”

The assemblyman said progress has been made but there is still a lot of work to do in the communities devastated by Sandy.

“We have come a long way and we’ve got a long way to go but I’m quite confident that we’re going to build back stronger and better than ever,” said Goldfeder.

A day of service was held in Breezy on Tuesday, but local officials said that work can’t come only on the anniversary.

“The truth is, the job here is not done,” Manhattan Borough President and Democratic city comptroller nominee Scott Stringer said.

He said there’s still a lot of aid on the way.

“If we don’t watch that money, if we don’t audit that money, if we don’t make sure that the resources are going to the communities that need it the most,” we will have not respected the victims of the storm, Stringer said.

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