Yankees

Report: A-Rod Failed Drug Test For Stimulants In 2006

One Of A-Rod's Legal Representatives Has Denied The Accusation
Yankees third baseman Alex Rodriguez (Photo by Jared Wickerham/Getty Images)

Yankees third baseman Alex Rodriguez (Photo by Jared Wickerham/Getty Images)

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NEW YORK (CBSNewYork) — The A-Rod saga never goes away — we know that.

It only gets uglier and more convoluted.

The Yankees’ third baseman is currently appealing a 211-game suspension handed down by Major League Baseball for his ties to the now-defunct Biogenesis of America clinic. He is accused of violating the league’s drug policy.

In related news, the New York Times has reported that the three-time American League MVP failed a drug test for stimulants back in 2006.

Lanny J. Davis, one of the representatives of A-Rod’s high-powered legal team, denied the accusation to the newspaper. In addition, according to the New York Daily News, A-Rod’s attorneys have filed a complaint. The complaint alleges that MLB leaked the information about the failed drug test to the media.

Rodriguez’s appeal will kick off again on November 18. The first part of Rodriguez’s arbitration hearing concluded in October.

The slugger is also suing Major League Baseball and MLB Commissioner Bud Selig for alleged misconduct.

“I am deeply troubled by my team’s investigative findings with respect to MLB’s conduct,” Rodriguez said in a statement last week. “How can the gross, ongoing misconduct of the MLB investigations division not be relevant to my suspension, when my suspension supposedly results directly from that division’s work?

“It is sad that commissioner Selig once again is turning a blind eye, knowing that crimes are being committed under his regime. I have 100 percent faith in my legal team. To be sure, this fight is necessary to protect me, but it also serves the interests of the next 18-year-old coming into the league, to be sure he doesn’t step into the house of horrors that I am being forced to walk through.”

Major League Baseball is attempting to get the lawsuit thrown out. MLB chief operating officer Rob Manfred fired back at Rodriguez’s statement with one of his own.

This latest, sad chapter in Mr. Rodriguez’s tarnished career is yet another example of this player trying to avoid taking responsibility for his poor choices,” Manfred said. “Given the disappointing acts that Mr. Rodriguez has repeatedly made throughout his career, his expressed concern for young people rings very hollow.

“Mr. Rodriguez’s use of PEDs was longer and more pervasive than any other player, and when this process is complete, the facts will prove that it is Mr. Rodriguez and his representatives who have engaged in ongoing, gross misconduct.”

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