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NY State Troopers Using Tall, Unmarked SUVs To Peer In On Texting Drivers

High Vantage Point Helps Troopers See Drivers' Hands
Texting while driving (file/credit: CBS 2)

Texting while driving (file/credit: CBS 2)

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MOUNT PLEASANT, N.Y. (CBSNewYork/AP) – Even for a state trooper, it’s not easy to spot drivers who are texting. Their smartphones are down on their laps, not at their ears. And they’re probably not moving their lips.

That’s why New York has given state police 32 tall, unmarked SUVs to better peer down at drivers’ hands, part of one of the nation’s most aggressive attacks on texting while driving that also includes steeper penalties and dozens of highway “Texting Zones,” where motorists can pull over to use their devices.

The Concealed Identity Traffic Enforcement (CITE) vehicles come in different colors so they blend in with traffic and are equipped with hidden high-intensity emergency lights.

New York is among 41 states that ban text messaging for all drivers and is among only 12 that prohibit using hand-held cellphones. The state this year stiffened penalties for motorists caught using hand-held devices to talk or text, increasing penalty points on the driving record from three to five, along with tickets that carry fines of up to $200.

With the tough new penalties came tougher enforcement. In a two-month crackdown this summer, troopers handed out 5,553 tickets for texting while driving, compared to 924 in the same period last year.

In New York’s recent push, 91 existing rest areas and turnoffs on the state Thruway and other highways have been rebranded “Texting Zones,” some advertised with blue signs declaring “It can wait. Text stop 5 miles.”

“To our knowledge, New York is the first,” Jonathan Adkins, deputy executive director of the Governors Highway Safety Association, said of the texting turnoffs. “It’s an intriguing approach and one that we think will pay dividends and be duplicated in other states.”

The National Highway Traffic Safety Administration says that at any moment during daylight hours, 660,000 drivers in the United States are texting, using cellphones or otherwise manipulating electronic devices. It says more than 3,300 people were killed and 421,000 injured in crashes caused by distracted driving last year.

Major Michael Kopy, commander of the state police troop patrolling the corridor between New York City and Albany, quoted a Virginia Tech study that found texting while driving increased the chance of a collision by 23 times and took eyes off the road for five seconds — more than the length of a football field at highway speed.

Kopy worries that as teens get their driver’s licenses, texting on the road will become more prevalent. “More people are coming of driving age who have had these hand-held devices for many years, and now as they start to drive, they’re putting the two together, texting and driving, when they shouldn’t.”

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(TM and © Copyright 2013 CBS Radio Inc. and its relevant subsidiaries. CBS RADIO and EYE Logo TM and Copyright 2013 CBS Broadcasting Inc. Used under license. All Rights Reserved. This material may not be published, broadcast, rewritten, or redistributed. The Associated Press contributed to this report.)