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Connecticut Officials, Residents Take Steps To Help Prevent Roof Collapses

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CONNECTICUT (CBSNewYork) — The sheer number of snow events coupled with the lack of warm temperatures to melt the snow is raising concerns about just how much weight is being put on rooftops.

As CBS 2’s Lou Young reported, some in Fairfield County, Conn. are taking preventative measures to avoid the potential for a roof collapse.

In Bloomfield, a brigade of shovelers worked throughout the day Wednesday to remove snow sitting on top of a three story condo complex. The crew pushed the snow over the ledge and onto the ground, hoping to lessen the load in advance of the next snowstorm.

Many told Young they think it’s the smart thing to do.

“Prudence does dictate that you take precautions, yes; Experience tells,” said Newtown resident Bob Graham.

Residents have also taken to using roof rakes to pull down old snow and ice as the next storm approaches.

In Danbury, the mayor ordered inspections of older structures and buildings with flat roofs, Young reported.

“There’s a snow test they can do, they can figure out how much weight can be held by the roof. If it looks like it’s going to be more than what the roof can stand then we’re ordering people to shovel the roof,” Danbury Mayor Mark Boughton said.

“Our worst fear is, of course, a potential collapse. And these collapses could be a garage or a shed, but they could also be a residential or commercial building,” explained Danbury Fire Chief Geoffrey Herald.

Massive icicles hanging from buildings are also posing a potential hazard.

Officials are suggesting to try and bring any large icicles down ahead of Thursday’s snowstorm in order to reduce the danger to pedestrians, Young reported.

“Those things can kill you. I mean, you can get hit in the head if it falls. You should watch them, if you’ve got a snow rake you can knock them down with a snow rake. But you have to be careful,” Boughton said.

Officials said the general rule is that if it doesn’t melt, and it keeps piling up, it’s eventually going to come down one way or another.

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