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Crews Out In Force Resurfacing Pothole-Laden NYC Roads

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NEW YORK (CBSNewYork) — The New York City Department of Transportation has been firing on all cylinders this spring, working to fill all the potholes left behind by the brutal winter.

As CBS 2’s Kathryn Brown reported Tuesday, the crews have been working around the clock, and drivers remained frustrated even with the weather having turned the corner.

“It’s terrible,” said motorist Anthony Staniszweski. “I’m waiting for something to break in my car.”

The especially nasty winter left roads looking and feeling liked chopped up concrete.

“There’s a title=”Cab Drivers Line Up At Repair Shops To Fix Damage From Potholes” href=”http://newyork.cbslocal.com/2014/02/15/cab-drivers-line-up-at-repair-shops-to-fix-damage-from-pot-holes/”>potholes everywhere — all over the city, all over Brooklyn, everywhere,” said motorist Gabriel Guzman.

DOT crews have filled 284,000 potholes so far this year – more than double than the 112,000 last year.

“In the six years I’ve been here, this was, I would probably say, about the worst I’ve seen the roads with the conditions,” said DOT highway repairer Larry Deodato.

And the season isn’t over yet — with warmer weather bringing potholes to the surface.

“I think you never declare victory,” said DOT Commissioner Polly Trottenberg. “I think you declare that we’ve made tremendous progress.”

With spring officially here, crews have been moving away from spot filling individual potholes in favor of resurfacing entire streets. So over the next few months, all across New York City, you’ll see a lot more road work zones.

“It could double my trip if a lane is closed, but on the long run, it’ll be helpful for the drivers,” Guzman said.

The goal is to resurface 1,000 miles of city roads by this summer.

It is a temporary inconvenience to be sure, but drivers and crews said it would be worth it if it meant fewer potholes.

“We’ve got a ways to go, but things are looking up,” Deodato said.

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