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North Hills, L.I. Approves Law Requiring Residents To Clean Up After Dogs On Own Property

If You Don't Obey You Could Face A Fine Between $50 And $200
(Credit: CBS 2)

(Credit: CBS 2)

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your home listical graphic North Hills, L.I. Approves Law Requiring Residents To Clean Up After Dogs On Own Property

NORTH HILLS, N.Y. (CBSNewYork) — The village of North Hills, Long Island, has approved a law requiring homeowners to clean up after their dogs – even on their own property.

The North Hills mayor’s office confirmed to CBS 2 that the law passed Wednesday night by a vote of 5-0.

The law will require homeowners to promptly remove dog poop from their own lawns, driveways and walking paths, place it in a plastic bag and dispose of it in a covered trash bin or face a fine, CBS 2’s Jennifer McLogan reported earlier this week.

“If it is a health hazard in a public area, and you are an adjoining property owner, it could just as well be a health hazard to your neighbor if you don’t properly pick up the feces from your own property,” Mayor Marvin Natiss said.

The law came in response to a resident who complained that a neighbor wasn’t cleaning up after their dogs and the lawn was littered with feces.

“They have two small children,” Natiss explained. “An adjoining property owner was allowing a dog to drop its feces, was not promptly picking up after the dog, and the neighbor was concerned it was a health hazard to their own children.”

A public dog cleanup law already had been in place, but the new law is for private properties, WCBS 880’s Sophia Hall reported.

The mayor said he and the Board of Trustees acted swiftly — amending the animal nuisance ordinance, which will be voted on following a public hearing.

Some animal advocates who spoke with McLogan said they agree dog owners need to be responsible for their own animals, but worry that North Hills is going too far, infringing on the rights of property owners.

“This law is likely to be subject to challenge because it does seem to be a bit intrusive, over the top, unnecessary,” said Nassau animal advocate attorney Beverly Poppell.

Natiss said he doesn’t expect too many people to break the new law. But if a resident does not obey, they will be fined $50 and $200, Hall reported.

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