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Yankees: NY Post Article On Jeter Game Ticket Price Hike ‘Untrue’

American League All-Star Derek Jeter #2 of the New York Yankees acknowledges the crowd before his first at bat during the 85th MLB All-Star Game at Target Field on July 15, 2014 in Minneapolis, Minnesota. (Photo by Rob Carr/Getty Images)

American League All-Star Derek Jeter #2 of the New York Yankees acknowledges the crowd before his first at bat during the 85th MLB All-Star Game at Target Field on July 15, 2014 in Minneapolis, Minnesota. (Photo by Rob Carr/Getty Images)

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NEW YORK (CBSNewYork)The Yankees came out swinging Sunday after a New York Post article accused the team of hiking up ticket prices to a special game honoring retiring superstar Derek Jeter.

The New York Post article that ran Sunday said everyday fans were being frozen¬†out of the historic event because of the soaring price of tickets to the Sept. 7 game against Kansas City, both on the resale market as well as the Yankees’ official site.

The newspaper reported that the team raised the price for the cheapest tickets on its website from $16 to $250 before quickly selling out, leading some fans to complain the Yankees were guilty of price gouging.

“I hate to say anything bad about the Yankees, but they’re basically scalping,” Bronx Bombers fan Dan Gregory told the Post. “I’m shocked, really disappointed.”

The Yankees, however, issued a statement Sunday saying the article was false.

“The New York Yankees have not, did not, and will not raise any ticket prices for the game to be played in Yankee Stadium on September 7, or for that matter, any other game to be played at Yankee Stadium this season,” the team said. “The statement that ‘[t]he team hiked the cheapest tickets on its Web site a stunning 1,250 percent — from $16 to $250 … ‘ is absolutely and categorically untrue.”

The Yankees said the article confused the primary ticket market with online resellers such as StubHub, Craigslist, Yankees Ticket Exchange and VividSeats.

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