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10 Players Who Should Be In The Baseball Hall Of Fame

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By Daniel Friedman
» More Columns

This week, the Baseball Hall of Fame welcomed it’s 2014 inductee class. As always, there were players who didn’t make the cut, leaving the window open to continue the debate as to who should get in and who shouldn’t. Here are 10 players who have a valid case:

NOTE: Pete Rose is not on this list because he’s been banned from baseball and it’s unlikely that will ever change. Barry Bonds, Mark McGwire, Sammy Sosa, Roger Clemens and Rafael Palmeiro are not mentioned because of their link to performance-enhancing drugs. (Also, Palmeiro is no longer on the ballot after receiving just 4.4 percent of the vote in 2014.) 

10. Lou Whitaker

Lou Whitaker (Photo credit should read MARK PHILLIPS/AFP/Getty Images)

Lou Whitaker (Photo by MARK PHILLIPS/Getty Images)

He shockingly received just 2.9 percent of the vote in his first year on the ballot back in 2001. But as far as second basemen go, Whitaker’s offensive ability was among the best of the best.

9. Jeff Kent

Jeff Kent (Photo by Jed Jacobsohn /Getty Images)

Jeff Kent (Photo by Jed Jacobsohn /Getty Images)

Hit more home runs than any other second baseman in MLB history (351). His fielding was decent, but if you look past that and focus on his record at the plate, he deserves to be in the conversation.

8. Larry Walker

Larry Walker (Photo by Stephen Dunn/Getty Images)

Larry Walker (Photo by Stephen Dunn/Getty Images)

Coors Field helped, but that doesn’t change the fact that Walker could flat-out smack the cover off the ball. When you think of great power hitters of the 90s, he comes to mind.

7. Edgar Martinez

Edgar Martinez (Photo by Otto Greule Jr/Getty Images)

Edgar Martinez (Photo by Otto Greule Jr/Getty Images)

Might have been the most underrated player on the Mariners during their golden age. Was very, very talented.

6. Curt Schilling

Curt Schilling (Photo by Nick Laham/Getty Images)

Curt Schilling (Photo by Nick Laham/Getty Images)

Helped the Diamondbacks and Red Sox win championships and was one of the most dominant pitchers in baseball during the late 90s and early-mid 2000s.

5. Alan Trammell

Alan Trammell (Photo by Otto Greule Jr/Getty Images)

Alan Trammell (Photo by Otto Greule Jr/Getty Images)

He wasn’t stellar at any particular aspect of the game, but he was a very good fielder and did win three Silver Slugger Awards. He was consistent, too. He’s not covered in glitter, but the numbers show that he’s a worthy candidate.

4. Jeff Bagwell

Jeff Bagwell (Photo by Ronald Martinez/Getty Images)

Jeff Bagwell (Photo by Ronald Martinez/Getty Images)

Great hitter, great first baseman. Only 12 players in MLB history have hit 400 homers and stolen 200 bases, and he’s one of them.

3. Craig Biggio

Craig Biggio (Photo by Ronald Martinez/Getty Images)

Craig Biggio (Photo by Ronald Martinez/Getty Images)

Over 3,000 hits and four gold gloves. One of the top infielders of his era.

2. Tim Raines

Tim Raines (Credit: Getty Images)

Tim Raines (Credit: Getty Images)

Raines was exceptionally good at three things: reaching base, stealing bases and scoring runs. He put up outstanding numbers that stack up with several current Hall of Famers, and he deserves to be honored the same way.

1. Mike Piazza

Mike Piazza (Photo by Ezra Shaw/Getty Images)

Mike Piazza (Photo by Ezra Shaw/Getty Images)

He’s the best hitting catcher of all time. You don’t need to know anything else.

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