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Election 2012: Post-Sandy Voting Information For N.Y., N.J., Conn.

November 1, 2012 10:00 AM

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(Photo credit should read EMMANUEL DUNAND/AFP/Getty Images)

Empty voting booths (credit: EMMANUEL DUNAND/AFP/Getty Images)

(Photo credit should read EMMANUEL DUNAND/AFP/Getty Images)

Empty voting booths (credit: EMMANUEL DUNAND/AFP/Getty Images)

Today is Election Day. If you have questions about voting after the superstorm Sandy, we have all the information you need on relocated polling sites, absentee ballots and voting by email or fax in some states.

LINKS: New York Board of Elections | New Jersey Division of Elections | Connecticut Secretary of State

New York

In New York, many polling sites sustained damage in the storm and won’t be ready in time for Tuesday. For information on your polling site, visit elections.ny.gov. You can also check here for a .pdf list of polling site changes.

Additionally, a toll-free number has been established by the New York State Board of Elections to help voters with questions, poll site changes and absentee ballots. The number is 1-855-NYS-SANDY (1-855-697-7263).

Governor Andrew Cuomo signed an order Monday night allowing New Yorkers to vote anywhere, but if they don’t vote in their regular polling place they would not be able to vote in local races.

EXTRA: Read The Governor’s Executive Order

The governor said New Yorkers should attempt to vote at their regular polling place. If they cannot reach their polling site or their site is shutdown, only then should they vote at an alternative site. The only votes that will count are the votes that voters would have legally been allowed to cast at their regular polling site.

EXTRA: NY Poll Site Changes Reported By County

The federally-declared disaster counties include: Bronx, Kings, Nassau, New York, Queens, Richmond, Rockland, Suffolk and Westchester.

In New York City, the locations and information on each borough’s Board of Elections are listed below to assist you with last-minute inquiries:

Bronx
1780 Grand Concourse, 5 Fl
Bronx, NY 10457
Tel: 1.718.299.9017
Fax: 1. 718.299.2140

Brooklyn
345 Adams Street, 4 Fl
Brooklyn, NY 11201
Tel: 1.718.797.8800
Fax: 1.718.248.5958

Queens
126-06 Queens Boulevard
Kew Gardens, NY 11415
Tel: 1.718.730.6730
Fax: 1.718.459.3384

Manhattan borough office is closed. Operations temporarily relocated to:
450 West 33rd Street, 10Flr
New York, NY 10001
Tel: 1. 212.465.0503
Fax: 1. 212.465.2135

Staten Island
1 Edgewater Plaza, 4 Fl
Staten Island, NY 10305
Tel: 1.718.876.0079
Fax: 1.718.876.0912

New Jersey

As Gov. Chris Christie said on Sunday, no one in New Jersey has an excuse to skip voting on Tuesday – even in the aftermath of Hurricane Sandy.

Polling places with power will vote as normal, while those without power will allow voters to cast their vote by paper ballot. If you need information on your polling station, text 877877 with your home address.

Ballot applications can be downloaded from the state’s website. Click here to be taken directly to necessary form. You can find your polling place by clicking here.

For a list of county election offices, websites and phone numbers, click here.

For more voter information, call 1-877-NJ-VOTER (1-877-658-6837).

Connecticut

In Connecticut, utility companies promised that all polling places in that state would have power Tuesday.

According to the Connecticut Secretary of the State’s website, two polling places in Bridgeport and New London have been relocated. For more information, click here.

Additional Voting Info

In New York, polls close at 9 p.m. In New Jersey and Connecticut, they close at 8 p.m.

Make sure you bring your driver’s license with you. If you don’t have a form of identification, you can provide proof of identity with the last four digits of your Social Security number, you can bring a valid photo ID or a government document such as the following:

– Current utility bill
– Paycheck
– Bank Statement

If you don’t have any of the above and it is your first time voting, you can ask for an affidavit or provisional ballot. This will require you to swear that you are a registered voter – your registration will then be confirmed afterward, so that your vote can be counted.

If you live in New York City, you’ll be using the city’s new voting machines, introduced in 2010. For a video explanation on how to use them, click here for a video from Vote NY.

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