Texas A&M Among Several Universities Leading The Way To Educate Veterans

October 23, 2014 9:00 AM

When it comes to providing education for veterans, many colleges and universities across the U.S. are offering assistance and specific programs for those who have served. Support for veterans and their families and dependents extends beyond monetary assistance, too. From scholarships to assistance with fulfilling course requirements, check out what some schools are offering for veterans.

Texas A&M University

Photo by Bob Levey/Getty Images

Photo by Bob Levey/Getty Images


With its roots as a military academy, it’s no wonder Texas A&M University in College Station, Texas is helping veterans, active duty, reserve and National Guard members complete their degrees. Programs and resources are also available for military dependents, families and survivors. There’s a lot more to do than enroll in classes and complete assignments, especially for those who have served. Texas A&M’s Veteran Services provide assistance during the transition to becoming students, and offers resource on an assortment of topics, including study skills. There are also plenty of academic resources for students, and a number of student veteran organizations so you can meet other veterans. Texas A&M’s program has been widely recognized for its assistance and support for veterans from U.S. New & World Report, Military Times, and other organizations.

Arizona State University

Photo Credit Thinkstock

Photo Credit Thinkstock


For some veterans, attending lectures in a traditional classroom setting may be difficult due to time and work commitments. However, there are plenty of colleges and universities that can make fulfilling coursework for a degree a reality. Arizona State University’s online programs for both undergraduate and graduate degrees have been recognized by U.S. News & World Report for its online veteran degree programs. Arizona State University has also been recognized for its on-campus programs for veterans through the Pat Tillman Veterans Center, which includes support for students and guidance in finding assistance and benefits. Staff can also assist students who are called to active duty. In addition to its online programs, Arizona State University has several campuses throughout the state, so students may have ease of use in finding a location near home or work.

Marquette University

Photo Credit Marquette University

Photo Credit Marquette University


For veterans attending college, finding and applying for financial assistance can be a daunting task. But Marquette University in Milwaukee, Wisconsin can help veterans and people on active duty find the assistance they need. From finding information on how to apply for federal veterans benefits to knowing what to do with school loans while on active duty, Marquette University can provide student veterans, dependents, active service members, reservists and National Guard members with the tools they need to complete their degrees. The school also has protocols in place for students who are called to active duty so that students can make a smooth transition. Marquette University also offers access to health services, and has a counseling center that can provide assistance for a number of concerns.

The University of Vermont

Photo by Justin Sullivan/Getty Images

Photo by Justin Sullivan/Getty Images


Located in Burlington, The University of Vermont’s Student Veteran Services program can assist military members making the transition to full-time students. The department can help student veterans find support networks and tutoring assistance for academic success. The University of Vermont also has the Student Veterans Organization, where you can meet other students who have shared similar experiences. There are a number of health services available for student veterans for both physical and mental well-being, too. But there’s more to the school than programs for veterans, as The University of Vermont commemorates fallen service members with a ceremony and a large display every year on Veterans Day.

Megan Horst-Hatch is a runner, reader, baker, gardener, knitter, and other words that end in “-er.” She is also the president of Megan Writes, LLC. Her work can be found at Examiner.com.


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