NEW YORK (WFAN/AP) — Mets right-hander Matt Harvey has been cleared to resume baseball activities, a day after having a procedure done to remedy blood clots in his bladder.

Speaking to Boomer & Carton on Tuesday, WFAN’s Ed Coleman said Harvey is expected to be fine following Monday’s procedure. The hard-throwing right-hander told reporters he will make the start when the Mets open the regular season Sunday against the World Series champion Royals in Kansas City.

Harvey’s status for the opener was in doubt Monday, after general manager Sandy Alderson said the veteran hurler was suffering from a mystery medical condition, one that had nothing to do with his surgically repaired right elbow.

As CBS2’s Otis Livingston explained, the pessimistic Met fan had about 24 hours to let his imagination run wild.

Coleman eased many fans’ fears, saying Harvey was feeling a lot better Tuesday.

“It sounded scary to me, but he said things came out fine and worked out fine and he looks OK. He looked OK coming in,” Coleman said.

For now, a major crisis has been averted. Rumors about Harvey’s health began to circulate once the Mets didn’t give an initial illness. The team only said that he might have to come back to New York to see a specialist.

Harvey spoke to reporters briefly Tuesday.

“It started with a bladder infection, and it created a blood clot in the bladder,” Harvey said. “I passed it yesterday. It wasn’t a great first day (after) my 27th birthday. But we cleared that. And then we had a little procedure done this morning just to go in and check the bladder, and everything was clear.”

He started to feel discomfort Sunday and said it worsened through the night. Harvey reported the issue to Mets staff on Monday and he was the lone player not to travel to Jupiter, Florida, for an exhibition game against St. Louis.

“I didn’t really know what was going on,” Harvey said. “I was having trouble using the restroom and, obviously, any time there’s discoloration in your urine, it’s not a great feeling. So I didn’t know what was going on with my stomach, but we had some tests yesterday and everything is fine now.”

Many people have never heard of blood clots in the bladder, but according to CBS2’s Dr. Max Gomez they aren’t uncommon.

There are many possible causes for the clots which can come from any point in the urinary system from the kidney on down.

Causes can include infections of the kidney, bladder, or urine tubes leading to the bladder. Kidney and bladder stones can cause blood clots, and most worrisome cancer of the bladder or kidneys can cause clots as well.

Doctors performed something called a cystoscopy, which involves a tiny camera being inserted into the bladder to look around. They apparently determined that it was an infection and nothing more serious.

Harvey said he needs to go to the bathroom more often. Bacteria can easily grow in urine, so if you don’t go often enough the germs can build up, irritate, and infect the lining of the badder leading to bleeding and blood clots. The solution is to drink more water and go to the bathroom more often.

Mets captain David Wright said he was in contact with Harvey the past few days.

“Obviously from a personal standpoint it’s a relief because you want to see guys in good health,” Wright said. “You never want to see anything else. And then from a baseball standpoint it’s good news as well. Good news on all fronts. Should be ready to roll and glad it’s basically a non-issue.”

Harvey, who went 13-8 with a 2.71 ERA in 29 starts in 2015, his first full season after missing all of 2014 while recovering from Tommy John surgery, was named Opening Day starter by manager Terry Collins last week.

A dominant pitcher during the early part of the season throughout his career, Harvey is 8-0 with a 2.15 ERA in 10 April starts, striking out 77 in 67 innings, while allowing opponents to hit just .181.

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