TRENTON, N.J. (CBSNewYork/AP) — The Assembly has passed legislation that would allow qualified New Jersey residents with post-traumatic stress disorder to get medical marijuana treatment.

The Democrat-led Assembly voted 55-14, with seven abstentions on Thursday. The bill heads to the Senate for consideration.

The legislation approves the disorder for treatment with marijuana only if it’s not treatable with conventional therapy.

Marijuana is currently approved in New Jersey to treat multiple sclerosis, terminal cancer and muscular dystrophy, among other medical diseases. It’s also approved for seizures and glaucoma if those conditions are resistant to conventional treatment.

Earlier this year, New Jersey Democratic Assembly members Tim Eustace, L. Grace Spencer and Angelica Jimenez also introduced a bill that would allow women with severe menstrual pain to qualify for medical marijuana use.

The U.S. Senate passed an amendment in November that would allow Veterans Administration doctors to recommend medical marijuana to veterans in states where it’s legal. The proposal failed to pass the House.

New Jersey Gov. Chris Christie has stated that he opposes expanding the state’s medical marijuana program, CBS2 reported.

Marijuana has been legalized for all uses in Colorado, Washington, Oregon and Alaska and for medical use in nearly 20 others, including New Jersey.

New Jersey held its first-ever meeting on legalizing the recreational use of marijuana in late 2015.

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