NEW YORK (CBSNewYork) — It was a text that no college student wants to get.

“Buckeye Alert: Active Shooter on campus. Run Hide Fight. Watts Hall. 19th and College.”

It warned students of an attack on campus with a reminder to follow the appropriate procedure.

“It’s unfortunate that situations like this are becoming so common,” Adelphi University student, Damni Rani said.

As CBS2’s Jennifer McLogan reported, at schools around the area — preparing for the worst is now part of the curriculum.

Students are instructed to run to a safe location, hide — by barricading doors, as they did at Ohio State — and ultimately fight back with whatever object is nearby.

“We did drills all the time to prepare if there were an active shooter,” Adelphi University student, Dana Aherns.

University police are changing with the times — armed with more than guns, mace, tasers, and cuffs they also carry ‘active shooter vests.’

“Every student is mandated a session which we call ‘campus safety 101’ which covers a variety of emergency situations like active shooter. We also go one step further to also include the parents at orientation.” Gene Palma, Adelphi University Public Safety, explained.

Such training was put into practice at Farmingdale State College earlier this year with shelter in place email and text warnings.

“I was actually pretty scared, looking through the window to see if I could see people running, but I kept myself calm and locked myself in,” Lisa Ferreras said.

Ultimately the threat was brought to a peaceful resolution.

“Gives a student an option in their heads of what they would do in that particular situation they find themselves in, instead of being completely blindsided in an actual emergency,” Farmingdale State, Assistant Police Chief, Daniel Daugherty said.

“The worst thing for an active shooter, they want to see people, they want to see potential victims,” Residence Hall Advisor, Josh Jones explained.

The President of Long Island Colleges and Universities said they prepare for situation’s like Ohio State’s but hope they never have one.

College administrators said they are grateful for good training and cooperation with local communities.