NEW YORK (CBSNewYork) — Gladys Carrión suddenly resigned Monday from her position as the commissioner of the Administration for Children’s Services in New York City.

As CBS2’s Andrea Grymes reported, Carrión’s resignation came in the wake of complaints about the agency’s handling of several high-profile child abuse cases. She wrote a letter to Mayor Bill de Blasio saying she had decided to resign “after much thought and deliberation.”

“I have struggled with this decision but have come to the conclusion that it is best for my well-being,” Carrión wrote in her resignation letter. “After 40 years of working on behalf of children and families, it is time for me to retire.”

Carrión was appointed to the position three years ago by Mayor Bill de Blasio.

“Gladys has spent four decades serving the public with excellence and an unparalleled commitment to the children and families of New York,” de Blasio said in a statement. “Gladys’ leadership and reforms have ushered in a heightened level of accountability and performance at the Administration for Children’s Services. That progress must continue as we work to meet one of the most difficult missions and mandates in city government.”

De Blasio said the search for her replacement was already under way late Monday.

“New Yorkers can rest assured that the Administration for Children’s Services will continue to be led by a passionate reformer who demands results,” he said.

On Dec. 5, a 3-year-old Brooklyn boy allegedly abused by his mother’s boyfriend died after he was taken off life support. Jaden Jordan was found unconscious with severe head injuries in his Gravesend home on Nov. 28.


The Administration for Children’s Services was tipped off to possible alleged abuse in the boy’s home, but workers went to the wrong address. They found the correct house three days later, the day Jordan was hospitalized.

In October, Carrión broke down in tears during a City Council hearing regarding the death of a 6-year-old Harlem boy.

“Losing a child is unbearable, and it’s my responsibility and one that I take seriously,” Carrión said at the Oct. 31 hearing.


The hearing came after it was revealed that the ACS previously investigated five complaints of abuse and neglect involving Zymere Perkins before the boy’s death on Sept. 26.

City Comptroller Scott Stringer, whose office launched an investigation into the ACS following the death of Perkins, issued a statement wishing Carrión well in the future, but calling for continued reform.

“It’s clear our city is failing our most vulnerable children. Whether it’s kids being put in dangerous foster care homes, cluster sites with serious violations, or commercial hotels where there are no services, the status quo is unacceptable,” Stringer said. “City Hall must breakdown agency silos and put forward a clear, transparent plan for reform. Commissioners come and go, but fundamental change must be here to stay.”

The Mayor’s office said Carrión was not asked to step down. She will stay on until a replacement is found.