NEW YORK (CBSNewYork) — There was talk in the political world Friday night that Hillary Clinton could shake off her presidential campaign loss with a run for mayor of New York City.

As CBS2 Political Reporter Marcia Kramer reported, Clinton’s staff were doing nothing to squelch the speculation.

De Blasio’s security detail did its best to keep reporters at bay Friday, as the mayor marched in the Three Kings Parade in East Harlem. It was not the one day at week that de Blasio entertains questions from reporters.

But Kramer’s question was about a queen rather than a king, and she did her best to seek the mayor’s thoughts.

“Mr. Mayor, Mr. Mayor, how do you feel about Hillary Clinton running for mayor?” Kramer asked. “How do you feel about Hillary Clinton running for your job?”

De Blasio did not answer and his staff told Kramer he was not taking questions. But his unwillingness to engage did nothing to kill the buzz about Clinton seeking the city’s top job.

The buzz is everywhere, from New York City to Washington, D.C., and all over social media.

De Blasio’s choice not to comment Friday also did not stop the speculation about what it would mean to have Clinton in charge of President-elect Donald Trump’s hometown. The clashes would surely be many.

“I would love to see that,” said Aiden Murtagh of the Upper West Side. He said he would vote for Clinton over de Blasio “for sure.”

“It’s funny, I was just thinking about that this morning,” said Tom Ort of Long Island City, Queens. “I mean, I like Hillary. I voted for her. But I’m not sure that I like the idea.”

“I would be interested to hear what she’d have to say,” said Mandana Libert of Long Island City.

“It’s a good idea,” said Ruben Castillo of Williamsburg, Brooklyn. “I love her. I’m still with her.”

Certainly, there is no shortage of people who want the job.

Wealthy real estate executive Paul Massey, a Republican, picked up the Independence Party endorsement this week. Another GOP possibility is Queens city Councilman Eric Ulrich (R-32nd).

Supermarket magnate John Catsimatidis, who ran in the 2013 Republican mayoral primary, is also mulling another run. He earlier said he would run as a fusion candidate.

The current crop of Democratic wannabes includes state Sen. Tony Avella (D-Queens), former City Councilman Sal Albanese, and private investigator Bo Dietl – whom the New York Times described as a lifelong who would change his party to run against de Blasio.

Bradley Tusk, who ran Mayor Michael Bloomberg’s 2008 third-term mayoral campaign, has been actively looking for a candidate to oppose de Blasio. He did a mayoral poll that included Clinton.

“She won the five boroughs in the election in a landslide, and I think that she would – she wouldn’t even have to run ads or do anything else; purely be on the ballot,” Tusk said.

And while many think the possibility of a Clinton mayoral campaign is a longshot, her camp is doing nothing to stop the speculation.

One person told Kramer that team Clinton “can’t start commenting on every little piece of gossip,” and another said, “It’s hers for the taking.”