NEW YORK (CBSNewYork) – It’s Primary Day in New York and polling sites opened at 6 a.m.

All eyes are on the Democratic gubernatorial race between incumbent Gov. Andrew Cuomo and challenger Cynthia Nixon.

“It’s an exciting day that we’ve worked so hard for and we’re seeing so much excitement – so much excitement, so much enthusiasm, so much momentum – in New York City, across the state,” Nixon told reporters as she cast her vote.

“This is an important election. First of all, I urge everybody to vote. I would love people’s support, but whoever you vote for, it’s important that you vote,” said Cuomo.

Watch: NY Democratic Gubernatorial Debate 

A recent debate on CBS2 proved they don’t agree on much – fighting over everything from subways, to corruption and health care. But in the days leading up to the primary, the two were focused on a scathing mailer sent by the state Democratic party charging that Nixon has been “silent on the rise of anti-Semitism.”

“You know we have more anti-semitic attacks in New York State now than we’ve had in years,” Cuomo said.

“I am the mother of Jewish children. Nothing could be further from the truth,” said Nixon. “He needs to say not only is this inappropriate, he needs to say that it’s completely untrue.”

Michael Valdes told CBS2’s Jenna DeAngelis he was voting for Nixon because he’s backing her progressive values.

“Just looking for change. I don’t want any more corruption,” he said.

Nixon also seemed to be gaining support for her stance on fixing the subways.

“She’s taking responsibility, for one, right? The governor holds a lot more responsibility over the trains than he wants to admit,” said Morgan Hargrove.

But some voters, like Aaron Weintraub, put their faith in two-term Gov. Cuomo to “get things done.”

“There’s a lot – everything coming out of Washington right now – there’s just so much to battle. There needs to be a really strong front,” he said.

“Cynthia Nixon – Albany would eat her alive,” said Michael Said.

Mayor Bill de Blasio cast his ballot in Brooklyn, though he has not endorsed either candidate.

The winner takes on Republican Marc Molinaro in November.

Voters will also weigh in on lieutenant governor, with Democratic candidate New York City Council member Jumaane Williams challenging incumbent Kathy Hochul.

Another closely watched race is the four-way Democratic contest for attorney general. The candidates include Fordham University law professor Zephyr Teachout, New York City Public Advocate Letitia James, U.S. Rep. Sean Patrick Maloney and former Hillary Clinton adviser Leecia Eve.

The winner takes on Republican Keith Wofford in the general election.