WHITE PLAINS, N.Y. (CBSNewYork) – One group of students are dedicating a day to getting a little dirty.

Instead of pulling books out their bags, students at Church Street School are pulling vegetables out of the ground, reports CBS2’s Jessica Layton.

“When I tell the kids all the time, when you see these green tops, but you never know what you’re going to get, so every year it’s a huge surprise,” said first grade teacher Deb Benge at Church Street School.

Five years ago, Benge started up a horticulture project, creating an award-winning green space in the center of their White Plains school called “The Garden That Keeps On Giving”

“Having this courtyard is a real unique resource and we wanted to tap into that,” she said.

At the end of every school year, students plant seeds in the garden. As they grow, so do their crops.

In addition to teaching them about science, they also learn about service since they sell the vegetables at a farmers market. All their proceeds go to a charity

“They learn about giving back to the community,” said principal Myra Castillo. “If we have the power to do something within our school, and harvest these vegetables to help others, that is a lesson we want students to learn.”

The lessons seem to be working.

“We have been learning to be kind, safe and responsible,” said second-grader Cristine Dynu.

Students plant things like beats, tomatoes and arugula, but picking carrots seems to be the favorite.

“I like harvesting because I like to eat the carrots,” said second-grader Theo Ruff.

MORE: New York City’s Best Farmers’ Markets

Some even say they’re getting better than their parents at this whole gardening thing.

“Shh… don’t tell anybody,” said fourth-grader Michael Radosta.

Last year, the school raised $800 for hurricane relief.

Their farmer’s market will be this Friday, but they’re still trying to figure out where this year’s donation will go.