NEW YORK (CBSNewYork) – Day by day, as the leaves are changing color, many may be wondering just how vibrant this year’s fall foliage will be.

CBS2’s Vanessa Murdock found out why this it could be one of the most spectacular fall season’s ever.

A section of trees bursting with the bold colors of fall gives a hint of what’s to come across the hillsides in just a couple of weeks, and Bayshore residents can’t wait.

“It’s like natures last burst of lushness before we hibernate,” said Holly Gordon.

“I enjoy the beauty of the change of seasons,” said Anna Marie Giarratano.

Todd Forrest is the vice president for Horticulture and Living Collections at the New York Botanical Garden. He talked on the edge of what is the largest remaining old growth forest in the city.

This year’s transition from green to glowing will be one for the history books if his foliage forecast holds true.

“It’s going to be the best fall that anyone can ever remember,” he said.

He says the primary factor affecting how good leaf peeping will get this fall will be the weather during the changeover.

“We have a spectacular fall when we clear, sunny days and cool but not freezing nights in the middle of October through the middle of November,” Forrest said.

If temperatures should trend toward warm, “you’ll still have fall color, you just won’t have the really beautiful and intense scarlets and purples,” he said.

Another major player in it being stellar season was the soggy summer.

The exceptionally wet summer means all of these trees are bursting with healthy foliage.

“With a dry year, trees will lose their leaves over the summer and leaves will start to turn early, but not beautiful,” said Forrest.

That’s not happening this year. A full canopy ablaze in golds, oranges and crimsons can be expected, especially during the first week of November in New York City.

To find some fall color this weekend, 15 percent of color change is expected in the Hudson Valley.

To see a full display, head to the Adirondacks where peak peeping is happening now.