NEW YORK (CBSNewYork) — It’s all about Andy!

The Whitney Museum is opening a new exhibit dedicated to Andy Warhol.

More than 300 of his pieces are on display.

CBS2’s Aundrea Cline-Thomas offers a preview, days before the show opens to the public.

“Andy Warhol, From A To B And Back Again” is the first retrospective look at his career in an American museum in 30 years.

“I have now been through the show about five or six times just as we’ve opened and I feel like I’ve just scratched the surface,” Whitney Museum director Adam Weinberg said.

Andy Warhol

Andy Warhol (1926 – 1987), American pop artist and filmmaker, holding an example of one of his posters. Original Publication: People Disc – HM0195 (Photo by John Minihan/Getty Images)

The artwork at the Whitney Museum is displayed chronologically, starting from the 1950s. Unlike other shows, this one goes beyond what many consider his prime, showcasing Warhol’s work until his death in the late 1980s. It includes many of the iconic pieces, such as the Campbell’s Soup cans.

Warhol is celebrated for putting up a mirror to American society and culture. Many say his interpretation was ahead of his time.

“He basically said the things that are in our world, these are the things that are our lives. We should accept it. We should think about it. We should experience it. We should deal with it,” Weinberg said.

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Donna De Salvo, who worked with Warhol, curated the show that features more than 300 hand-picked pieces.

“The power of Warhol’s work really stems from his acute awareness of how images both live in the culture and how powerful they can be and how they need to be presented,” De Salvo said.

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Among the guests given a special preview was Warhol’s nephew, James Warhola.

“I think he would be thrilled that he’s being recognized in such an important way,” Warhola said.

More than three decades after his death, Warhol’s art continues to draw crowds and remains relevant.

The exhibit opens to the public on Nov. 12 and runs through March.