LARCHMONT, N.Y. (CBSNewYork) — The art of making slime continues to take younger generations by storm. But it’s often a messy undertaking, one that two entrepreneurial mothers are hoping to curb.

Tired of cleaning kitchen tables and countertops? Larchmont mom Stacey Sarver came up with the idea to create a carefree place for children to make slime, and leave the mess behind.

“I became the go-to house to make slime. My whole kitchen table was dedicated to slime,” Sarver told CBS2’s Ali Bauman on Monday.

Sarver said that got old quickly. So, together with fellow mom Nicole Fiftal, D.I.Y. Slime was born. Right in downtown Larchmont, parents can soon bring their children to a slime-making workshop, a place where kids can get their hands dirty, with no cleanup required.

Two Larchmont, N.Y,. mothers recently opened a slime-making workshop. (Photo: CBS2)

“It’s really just household ingredients, which is why so many families or kids try and make it at home or successfully make it and leave a mess,” Fiftal said.

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The base of slime is glue. Using starch or even something as simple as contact solution, it gets its consistency. Then, it’s mixed with dyes for color. D.I.Y. Slime offers more than 40 types of slime, with 75 add-ins, like glitter and golf leaf.

Sarver said she came up with the idea years ago, but always assumed someone else would beat her to it.

“When I finally said, ‘Well, why am I waiting for someone else to do it? You know what? You only live once. Let me see if I can do it,'” Sarver said. “Sometimes if you sit down and you actually make a plan you can get it done.”

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Once she put her concerns behind her, the shop came to life. Now the women say they want to tell their story, proving working moms can do anything. They hope to lead by example, and even show their young girls that nothing is out of reach.

“We both just feel very strongly that we want to be good examples for our girls. They can do whatever they want to do and if they have an idea they should go for it. And they don’t need anyone else to help them,” Fiftal said.

According the Women’s Business Enterprise National Council, as of 2018, there were 12.3 million women-owned businesses in the United States, meaning women own every 4 out of 10 businesses, and employ just over 9 million people.

If you’re interested in slime-making, this Wednesday afternoon is the workshop’s grand opening. It will be followed by an open house this weekend and the charge is $10 and up depending on add-ins.

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