PORT WASHINGTON, N.Y. (CBSNewYork) — In a time when the world is looking for change, one teen took it upon himself to create his own.

As CBS2’s Steve Overmyer reports, he did it by using his time at home during the lockdown to set up a business that’s making a difference.

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Thirteen-year-old Isaac Graubard started the eco-friendly business North Shore Refills during the pandemic to try to make a difference. (Credit: CBS2)

It’s a small, eco-friendly business only a month old and created by a 13-year-old named Isaac Graubard.

“During COVID, Isaac was home a lot and he noticed a lot of plastic bottles in our recycling bin. I think that triggered him to think how he can reduce his carbon footprint, our carbon footprint and help the world,” Isaac’s father, Jordan Graubard, told Overmyer.

“It just was so sickening to see all those plastic bottles turn up pile after pile in the recycling bin,” said Isaac. “And you know, I really thought it did something, but after doing research, I only found out that 9% of plastics get recycled, and it’s sickening to think that we try so hard but nothing actually happens because of it.”

Because there are thousands of different kinds of plastic, they can’t be broken down in the same ways. Instead of throwing plastics away, just reuse them.

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Thirteen-year-old Isaac Graubard started the eco-friendly business North Shore Refills during the pandemic to try to make a difference. (Credit: CBS2)

“Any bottle you have nowadays, you can upcycle. Reuse, reduce, you know, anything like that. You can bring your bottle that you have already at home and just refill — so simple,” Isaac said.

With a $750 investment, he purchased eco-friendly shampoos and soaps. He set up in front of his house and at a local market in Port Washington. All you have to do is swing by for a refill.

It’s less than $1 per ounce, and while refills may seem like a little adjustment, if more people do it, Isaac said “that creates the movement.”

“When people make the small step, not the large step, people think, ‘oh, it’s not so bad,'” he said.

Small steps can lead to big changes. Advice from a 13-year-old who’s doing just that.

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