NEW YORK (CBSNewYork) — As the COVID vaccine rollout continues with some bumps in the road, questions about the shots keep coming in.

Can you get a shot if you’ve had COVID? And what about the new strain from the United Kingdom?

CBS2’s Dr. Max Gomez has the answers.

Our first question is from Erica. It’s one that has many people worried:

Will the current vaccines protect against the new coronavirus strain from the U.K.?

Every expert Dr. Max spoke with said they believe the vaccines will be protective against the new strain, and now we have some scientific data to back that up.

A not-yet peer reviewed study by Pfizer and the University of Texas Medical Branch indicates the COVID-19 vaccine is effective in neutralizing the U.K. coronavirus mutation.

While the study is limited because it was done on blood samples in the lab and not on people, it is consistent with similar positive tests on 15 other mutations so far. So, it’s all good for now.

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The next question is from David and a number of others:

Do I have to test negative to get the vaccine and what happens if I have COVID and get the vaccine?

Here’s what the CDC says about that, based partly on clinical trial evidence and partly on extrapolation from other studies.

The Pfizer and Moderna mRNA COVID-19 vaccines are safe in persons who’ve had prior COVID infection, whether they had symptoms or not. That said, someone who’s had COVID is relatively immune for 90 days or so and could delay their vaccine, but it is safe to get one at any time.

MORE: What’s In The Vaccine? Is One Vaccine Better Or More Effective Than The Other?

Likewise, a COVID test, positive or negative, is not necessary or recommended before getting the vaccine. But if you have an active COVID infection, the CDC says to wait until you’re fully recovered and out of the quarantine period.

In other words, if you can get a vaccine, go for it regardless of a COVID test or previous infection.

These recommendations apply only to the Pfizer and Moderna vaccines. There may be new guidance once other vaccines are given authorization.

To submit your question to Dr. Max, click here

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