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Primary Day 2010: Results

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A woman casts her vote at the 92nd Street Y/PHOTO CREDIT DNAinfo/Gabriela Resto-Montero

A woman casts her vote at the 92nd Street Y/PHOTO CREDIT DNAinfo/Gabriela Resto-Montero

NEW YORK (CBS 2/1010 WINS/AP) – Primary Day in New York was full of surprises.

LISTEN: 1010 WINS’ Terry Sheridan Reports

Governor:

Rick Lazio got the nod from the New York GOP and the Conservative Party, but voters chose Buffalo businessman Carl Paladino, whose support base, Tea Party supporters, back smaller government, fiscal discipline, and stricter adherence to the Constitution.

Paladino will take on Andrew Cuomo, the current attorney general who has a commanding lead in the polls and a $24-million war chest.

Lazio will still be on the November ballot.

U.S. Senate:

U.S. Senator Kirsten Gillibrand’s campaign says it will begin airing TV ads in Buffalo, Syracuse and Rochester.

The announcement comes a day after Joe DioGuardi, a former congressman from suburban Westchester County, won the Republican line to run against Gillibrand in November.

LISTEN: WCBS 880’s Catherine Cioffi with Joseph DioGuardi

They’re the first ads from Gillibrand, who is ahead of DioGuardi in the polls and in fundraising.

The ads promote Gillibrand as a reform-minded senator devoted to public transparency. In the ad, Gillibrand says she hasn’t been in Washington long, but she has been there long enough to know that things are broken.

Gillibrand was first elected to a House seat in 2006. The Democrat from the Hudson Valley was appointed to the Senate last year to fill the unexpired term of Hillary Rodham Clinton, who became secretary of state.

NY Legislature:

Rep. Charlie Rangel was facing more than a dozen ethics charges in Congress, and a House panel was preparing to convene his ethics trial later this month, but voters gave him another chance to stay in Washington. The Harlem congressman easily defeated his five challengers, and was all but guaranteed re-election in November in his heavily Democratic district.

Bronx State Senator Pedro Espada, who’s facing several investigations into a health clinic that he runs in the Bronx, lost to first-time candidate Gustavo Rivera.

Former Queens State Senator Hiram Monserrate also lost in his attempt to return to Albany as an assemblyman to Francisco Moya. Monserrate fell out of favor after his conviction for assaulting his girlfriend.

Former Congressman Joseph DioGuardi from suburban Westchester County won a three-way Republican primary election in a bid to unseat Sen. Kirsten Gillibrand of New York. He had to petition his way on to the ballot after failing to muster enough party support at the state convention.

DioGuardi defeated Bruce Blakeman, a former Long Island local lawmaker, and David Malpass, a former Bear Stearns chief economist.

Democratic New York Rep. Carolyn Maloney defeated hedge fund lawyer Reshma Saujani, who depicted her as ineffective and out of touch with her constituents. The district covers Manhattan’s east side and part of Queens.

NY Attorney General:

Manhattan State Senator Eric Schneiderman narrowly defeated Nassau County District Attorney Kathleen Rice.

With 98-percent of precincts reporting, Democrat Schneiderman held a two point lead over Rice, with the other three candidates Sean Coffey, Richard Brodsky and Eric Dinallo receiving less than half their votes.

Voting Problems:

State Comptroller Thomas DiNapoli was vowing to investigate all of the problems reported at polling places throughout the state.

New York’s new electronic voting machines made their debut during Tuesday’s primaries, but there were a number of first day hiccoughs, including reports of polling places opening late, unprepared poll workers and broken machines.

The City Board of Elections said it’s working to address the voting snags and asks that voters be patient.

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