17 Aliases Later, Alleged Con Artist Arrested

Cops: Nydia Vega's Run Of Deception Went On For Decades

WESTHAMPTON, N.Y. (CBS 2) — She played on the sympathies of store owners and friends who accepted her bogus checks.

Police call her a con artist who swindled her way into high society. On Thursday, a woman with 17 aliases was behind bars.

She dined at the finest Hamptons restaurants, arranged invitations to the grandest of private parties, shopped at the most exclusive stores, arrived at East End beaches by way of a limo and driver and tooled around to dozens of charity events behind the wheels of Porsches and Jaguars.

Police said Anezka Jureckova and her Hamptons lingerie store were duped out of $2,500 — one of the many victims of 63-year-old Nydia Vega, an alleged professional high society flim-flam artist accused of spinning lies of inheritance and opulence.

According to Suffolk County assistant district attorney Jodi Franzese, Vega’s most recent charade in the Hamptons was a real doozey.

“Pretending to be a millionaire widow whose husband — a millionaire — recently died,” Franzese told CBS 2’s Jennifer McLogan.

During a stunning court bail hearing it was charged Vega goes by 17 aliases, has four social security numbers, two dates of birth and 15 addresses.

The district attorney said Vega’s $30,000 check bounced for a Hamptons rental and some backyard sculptures. She owes $27,000 to Hildreth’s department store for bedding and furniture and another $20,000 for a Harley-Davidson.

“She would pull up in Porsches or Maserati and you believed she had a lot of money, yes,” victim Michael Chornoma said.

Other victims said the hoax was cruel.

When asked if Vega played on her sympathy, Jureckova said, “Yes, because I also lost my husband as well. I felt sorry for her.”

McLogan obtained a photo from one the last Hamptons parties Vega attended. Police said Vega’s crimes may go back to 1977 spanning three states and $10 million.

Calling her a flight risk, Suffolk’s DA will seek $250,000 bail when Vega’s hearing is continued Friday in Riverhead court.

Vega pleaded not guilty.

More from Jennifer McLogan
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    […] later admitted he’d carried out the scam hundreds of times over the years, reported WCBS 880’s Irene […]

  • http://www.coursesdirect.com.au Russell Rusich

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  • D

    My guess is that she grew up poor and comes from nothing. Very few of the wealthy that she scammed can understand this and I doubt the old lady bankrupted any of them.
    It’s like the old saying goes; “When you have nothing, you have nothing to lose.” She simply went crazy having every door she opened slammed in her face and figured out a way to open those doors because she does have talent.
    Poor doesn’t mean stupid. What would have happened if her talent had been cultivated at an early age before she became frustrated, angry and jaded?
    Perhaps we would have had an eloquent and influential ambassador to the world, instead of that greedy, self-serving fat ass Swillary.
    For some reason our educational system doesn’t cultivate talent diligently enough and too much talent gets washed into the gutter because of class warfare.
    It won’t change until we put every resource we possess into identifying talent early on and nurturing it as if it were the most important gift this world could ever have bestowed upon it because it is.
    Quality education shouldn’t only be for those who can afford it, quality education should be for those who have talent, no matter what social class they’ve been born helplessly into.
    Otherwise, we’ll all keep on reading about talented criminals who’ve fallen through the cracks and clawed and fought their way back into society using the talent that was carelessly thrown away by society in the first place.
    She’s wrong and deserves punishment but the choice is still there for us to make; More talented criminals or, betterment of the human species genetic stock? This shouldn’t be a tough decision.

    • fern


  • Will

    Will the DA let her write a check?

  • M B

    Since she loves playing other people so much and if she is convicted I think the best punishment is life in prison with zero human contact. She should be fed through a little hole, no one should talk to her and she should get 1 hour alone a day in a walled courtyard with no one within 100 ft of her/visible to her. aka she should be forgotten by the world in the purest form.

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