NJ Middle School Implements Drug Testing Program

BELVIDERE, N.J. (CBSNewYork) — A middle school in New Jersey is stepping up its fight against drugs. Starting in September, a new testing program will kick off.

When kids come back to class at Oxford Street School in Belvidere this fall, sixth, seventh and eighth graders may face drug testing in school.

“We’ll probably have the testing every couple of months. It’ll be random and we will test for four or five different types of drugs,” Principal Sandra Szabocsik told CBS 2’s Cindy Hsu.

The program is voluntary. So it’s up to parents whether to sign their kids up and the students will know if they’ve been enrolled.

All of the testing will be done in the school nurse’s office. If the student tests positive for drugs there would be no punishment, no suspension and police would not be notified. Instead, the parents would be called and the student would get counseling.

Robert Vines has two daughters in the school.

“The program is great because that would give you more chance to get more involved in your children’s life, through the school system without law enforcement coming into it,” Vines said.

Some parents in the area said its program that should go nationwide.

“With the drug problems that are existing all over in every community I think every student in my opinion should be tested,” Tony Beasley said.

Students from the school have mixed reviews.

“I think it’s getting into our business a little bit in school. I think our parents should deal with it. That’s my opinion,” seventh grader Melody Ciraky said.

“I think it’s a good idea. Kids who do that shouldn’t do that at this age,” sixth grader Megan Bentley added.

Principal Szabocsik said students can also use the testing as a way to deal with peer pressure when it comes to drugs.

“It’s a tool they can use to say no, at my school I have random drug testing, I don’t want to come up positive,” Szabocsik said.

She’s hoping it’s a lesson that will keep her students off drugs for a lifetime.

Students who test positive will be required to attend an early intervention program and the parents would be responsible to pay for the treatment program.

Should more school adopt drug testing programs? Sound off in our comments section below…

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Comments

One Comment

  1. Kenny Listing says:

    schools need to stop trying to raise our children. all they need to do is teach them academics like math and science, they don’t need to get involved in the students personal lives because thats what PARENTS are for. it is the parents responsibility to talk to their kids about drugs and how dangerous SOME of them can be. we as a society are doing everything we can to keep every single human being alive at all costs and it is costing us more than we think. we need to let the individual make their own decisions and if its dangerous to them then so be it. they obviously aren’t smart enough to have a sense of self preservation so i say let them do whatever the hell they want and if they kill themselves doing it then the rest of us are better off.

  2. cj says:

    Why not just put a chip in everybody w/ a direct link to the police/goverment/CIA/FBI/Interpool and get it over w/ already? Schools don’t have $ for supplies, art, PE and a host of other things, yet they have $ for drug testing? The parents can get a drug test at their local drugstore. The schools need to teach and leave the parenting up to the parents! Enough already!

  3. joey from b'hurst says:

    this will have a negative consequence. If a child does not test positive, he will be deemed a rat. The drug dealers will then put a contract out on him/her to be killed.

  4. mj says:

    welcome to new jersey the police state . how about MANDATORY testing of ALL politicians .

  5. ted says:

    I have no problem with the program and its intent. I would recommend that they extend the program to include mandatroy testing for school administrators. Maybe that would explain a lot about the school budgets that are passed.

  6. kendra says:

    you know everyone thinks its cool to try and do drugs these dayz so i think its very good that they are going to do drug testing in school cause you can we can fix this problem before it becomes to out of control and it becomes very hard to beat an addection cause the peer pressure is so intense umongst teens and there friends trying to challenge them in and out of school.

  7. gjk says:

    i remember back when the NYC subways sed to put ads on the trains about hat drus were illegal and dangerous. Me and my friends used to steal them so we’d know what we were buying. Now kis will be able to identify which of their friends gets the good stuff.

    Ah, it’s ood to see the schools edcating out students right!

  8. jk says:

    i remember back when the NYC subways sed to put ads on the trains about hat drus were illegal and dangerous. Me and my friends used to steal them so we’d know what we were buying. Now kis will be able to identify which of their friends gets the good stuff.

    Ah, it’s ood to see the schools edcating out students right!

  9. Richard Rogers says:

    Who is volunteering? Are students volunteering or are the parents choosing to enter/volunteer their own children for random testing? It makes a big difference in understanding how this program will work.

  10. Michael H. says:

    A voluntary random drug test? I don’t understand how that works. They randomly pick you for a drug test and then you have the option to take it or not? What middle school pothead in their right mind would agree to this?

    Taking all the fun out of junior high, i tell ya!

    1. KPMc says:

      It’s reading comprehension skills like yours that make people think we need to test students while they are still in school.

      The PARENTS volunteer to have their kids in the program and THEN tests would be administered randomly.

      You and Richard may have been smoking a little too much. Try to keep up here.

      1. Michael H. says:

        That was not at all clear in the article. It made no mention of the parents making a decision when it was first posted. My reading comprehension is fine. CBS’s article writing ability is in question here.

      2. Michael H. says:

        Also take note of the time my comment was posted and the timestamp of the article. The article was edited nearly 10 hours after my comment.

  11. DF says:

    This is a joke

Comments are closed.

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