CUNY Board of Trustees Approves Tuition Hikes Despite Student Protests

Many Students Say Increased Costs Will Adversely Affect Them.

NEW YORK (CBSNewYork) — Hundreds of City University of New York students and teachers took to the streets Monday night to protest a now-approved tuition hike.  Though the vote is over, students said their battle is just beginning.

The protesters rallied in front of Baruch College, where the CUNY Board of Trustees voted in favor of the proposed increases. The vote means an initial $300 increase and $300 more per year for five more years after that. Tuition will increase from $4,800 in 2011 to $6,330 by 2015.

Junior Lorenzo Davis said the increase may force him to drop out of school and head back home to Jamaica.

“I just can’t afford that amount. That’s the reason why I came here was because I can afford it. I heard it’s a credible school. And now it’s going up. I’m thinking of finding another school to go to,” Davis told CBS 2’s Hazel Sanchez.

Davis said he already struggles to pay $5,700 per semester with his job at Kmart.

1010 WINS’ Al Jones Reports From Outside Baruch College

Other City University students also said it’s a tough lesson in economics and one they find hard to swallow.

Vicky Checo said her part-time job and her father’s salary as a janitor are not enough to pay $9,000 a year for her education. She said the tuition increase is killing her future.

“It doesn’t incorporate transportation costs and general living costs. When you’re in college, you need to pay for certain things. So it’s just putting another burden. It’s gonna make me have to cut a day of school and work an extra day and compromise my education,” she said.

Students were riled up because last week a public hearing on the proposal turned ugly. Cops and students clashed as  baton-wielding security officers tried to prevent a riot.

“It’s 100 percent wrong. These are kids who can’t afford to go to NYU or Harvard or Princeton because they don’t have the funds,” Vincent LoGuidice, a senior from Middle Village, told CBS 2’s Marcia Kramer.

“For a lot of students, this series of tuition hikes is going to be something that either pushes them out of college or pushes them into debt once they finish college — neither of which is good for our city,” said Carwil Bjork-James, a graduate student and adjunct professor.

Students said they believe tuition should be free at CUNY, like it was in the past, 1010 WINS’ Al Jones reported.

City University officials said they need the money.  Enrollment is up 10 percent since 2007 to 270,000 students and its budget has been slashed by $300 million. Besides, they said, the school spends more than $1 billion a year on tuition assistance.

“The truth is that 6 out of 10 of our students who are undergraduates and full-time — they have no tuition currently and that will continue under the new system,” CUNY spokesman Michael Arena told Kramer.

Baruch decided to reschedule afternoon classes and limit student access during the board meeting to avoid a repeat of last week’s tuition hike protest which resulted in 15 arrests.

School officials said they made the decision to cancel classes to protect students and faculty and not to stop free speech.

What do you think of the tuition increase?  Share your thoughts in the comments section below…

Comments

One Comment

  1. END FEDERAL RESERVE SYSTEM says:

    YOUTUBE
    “Change is on the Horizon Part 3 of 3 The Farmer Claims Program ”

  2. END FEDERAL RESERVE says:

    YOUTUBE
    “Change is on the Horizon Part 3 of 3 The Farmer Claims Program ”

  3. CUNY says:

    For those of you who think CUNY is a bargain and people should stop complainig here are the facts: CUNY was established for the poor and it was free for over 100 years until open admissions was enacted. Most of the current and past people in high offices from politicians to business people to lawyers and doctors went to CUNY for free. After they graduated and built their lives, they imposed tuition on a student body were most of the population lives below the poverty level, so yes, even a raise in the subway fare causes problems. Most of the CUNY student body works full or part time while attenFor those of you who think CUNY is a bargain and people should stop complainig here are the facts: CUNY was established for the poor and it was free for over 100 years until open admissions was enacted. Most of the current and past people in high offices from politicians to business people to lawyers and doctors went to CUNY for free. After they graduated and built their lives, they imposed tuition on a student body were most of the population lives below the poverty level, so yes, even a raise in the subway fare causes problems. Most of the CUNY student body works full or part time while attending school (which probably causes them to be there longer as fees go up). Additionally the federal government and the state have decreased aide to public colleges since the 90s, as well as grants and loans. Enter the banks…..yep a cycle to keep the poor/ and even the middle class who can’t afford other colleges now, in debt.ding school (which probably causes them to be there longer as fees go up). Additionally the federal governement and the state have decreased aide to public colleges since the 90s, as well as grants and loans. Enter the banks…..yep a cycle to keep the poor/ and even the middle class who can’t afford other colleges now, in debt.

  4. oldwolf49 says:

    And good for them, ignore those kids it’s not like they need a good education anyway.

  5. CUNY student says:

    This is an outrage, considering tuition fees will jump 31% over the course of four years. Is minimum wage increasing at the same rate? How about the cost of living?
    I know people who apply for FAFSA and receive stipends to attend college. In my opinion, that stipend should not be rewarded. If recipients of FAFSA qualify to have all of their tuition covered, then so be it. However, that money left over should be allocated towards something else. It can be used to cover some of the tuition that other students have to pay.

  6. jay says:

    Who do these protesters think should pay for the rising costs of maintaining such a large University? Even with a $300 increase every year, CUNY remains one of the best bargains in the country. Some of these CUNY schools have top-notch programs and professors. I can vouch for the quality of education because I went to both a private college and a CUNY school. CUNY (Queens) was 100x better and more challenging. Grade inflation is a joke at many private colleges in this country.

    Most of these kids probably get financial aid anyway. And if they do get loans, they are likely graduating with reasonable loans.

    I feel bad for the kids that fell for the expensive liberal arts schools and now owe 100k with a degree in History or English.

    CUNY kids – stop complaining, everyone else has it much worse!

  7. CR says:

    we are talking about $300 here, less than the cost of a new iPhone, for a very high quality college education. people need to get real and stop this constant whining. nobody is quitting school over $300. everyone has to sacrifice and work a little harder in these difficult times.

  8. i'm an intern and i can pay my own education says:

    “I just can’t afford that amount. That’s the reason why I came here was because I can afford it. I heard it’s a credible school. And now it’s going up, I’m thinking of finding another school to go to,” Davis told CBS 2′s Hazel Sanchez. goodluck finding a cheaper school you brainless wonder.

    “Vicky Checo said her part-time job and her father’s salary as a janitor is not enough to pay $9,000 a year for her education. She says the tuition increase is killing her future.” i dont know what baruch you go to that 9,000 a year but it aint this one. how about taking out a loan and getting a good job after you graduate and paying it off. that sounds more logical then whining.

    Almost all the people protesting will only be slightly affected by this, so stop protesting so i can go to class you damn liberals.

    1. Michael H. says:

      Of course! Get yourself into crushing debt by the time you graduate! Why didn’t we think of that before? It’s so LOGICAL!!!

  9. J says:

    “For a lot of students, this series of tuition hikes is going to be something that either pushes them out of college or pushes them into debt once they finish college — neither of which is good for our city,” Carwil Bjork-James, a graduate students and adjunct professor, said.

    Hows this, for that, I will go to a prestigious university. CUNY once meant something.

  10. No New Taxes says:

    The tuition increase is a tax on the working class and poor students in NYC. Where is the Tea party to protest this new tax increase?

    1. END FEDERAL RESERVE says:

      see “END FEDERAL RESERVE” comment bellow

    2. Tee-Jay says:

      (1) Tuition is not a “tax” because CUNY is not a taxing authority. It’s providing a service – education – in exchange for money.

      (2) Even with the increase, CUNY will still be the LEAST expensive public university system in the country.

      (3) Most students get some form of financial aid.

  11. Single Mom of CUNY students says:

    An initial increase of $300 and an additional $300 for five more years after that comes to over $6800. Lovely. Thanks.

    1. Mom says:

      That’s with fees before someone corrects my math…

    2. CR says:

      it comes to $1800

    3. CUNY student says:

      it’s
      $300 initial
      $300 x 4 years = $1200
      total = $1500

      they are currently paying $4800.
      $4800 + $1500 = $6300.

  12. Juan says:

    18000 Baruch students plus faculty inconvenced with class cancellations b/c the Trustees insisted on holding their meeting at the Baruch campus. I hope this makes sense to SOMEBODY.

  13. Another Baruch Faculty Member says:

    So because of the stupid meeting, I am working for a remote location – they could have relocated the Trustee’s meeting to Zuccotti Park. But count on our stupid faculty union to join in on the demonstration.

  14. CUNY to make Jews attend class on Friday night says:

    Rather than cancel classes scheduled for Monday afternoon and evening at Baruch College outright, President Wallerstein has “rescheduled” such classes for Friday December 2nd, where they are “to meet in their same rooms at the same times.”

    http://www.baruch.cuny.edu/president/messages/11-26-11.htm

    This rearrangement poses a serious problem:

    Although less prevalent than decades ago, there are still a substantial number of Jewish students, and faculty, at CUNY schools, including Baruch. Indeed, unlike all major private institutions of higher learning in New York, all of the CUNY schools schedule their annual “Spring Break” to coincide with the dates of the Passover holiday, which in some years has fallen in late April, making for a rather delayed “Spring Break.”

    The announced rescheduling of today’s classes for FRIDAY means that observant Jews who would have had classes today must either compromise their religious beliefs by attending their rescheduled classes on Friday, or must skip such classes to avoid violating Sabbath restrictions.

    The CUNY adminstration should carefully review New York State Education Law, Article 5, section 224-a, which states the following:

    § 224-a. Students unable because of religious beliefs to register or
    attend classes on certain days.

    2. Any student in an institution of higher education who is unable,
    because of his or her religious beliefs, to attend classes on a
    particular day or days shall, because of such absence on the particular
    day or days, be excused from any examination or any study or work
    requirements.

    4. If registration, classes, examinations, study or work requirements
    are held on Friday after four o’clock post meridian or on Saturday,
    similar or makeup classes, examinations, study or work requirements or
    opportunity to register shall be made available on other days, where it
    is possible and practicable to do so.

    Jewish students and all faculty should note this law.

  15. A Baruch Faculty Member says:

    The main reason Baruch had to cancel classes is that CUNY’s Board of Trustees simply refused requests either to postpone their meeting or to move it to another venue that would allow for better crowd participation and control. It makes no sense to cancel almost 250 classes with thousands of students just to convenience the Chancellor and the fifteen politically-appointed trustees. Remember, this is the same group of trustees who voted to withhold an honorary degree from Tony Kushner last Spring.

  16. Nick says:

    How come these 99 Percenters always wants everything given for free. And yet, they refuse to work for free.

    1. KillNick says:

      wow…such an idiotic statement… you muse be blessed

      1. Amtracmarine says:

        Is it true that 6 out of 10 CUNY students don’t pay anything??

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