Some Nassau County Residents Complain Skies Are Louder Than Ever

NEW YORK (CBSNewYork) — Some residents along Nassau County’s North Shore said the Federal Aviation Administration’s new flight plans are making their lives miserable.

Community activist Leonard Schaier, of the group Citizens for Quiet Skies over North Hempstead, has been fielding complaints from his neighbors.

1010 WINS’ Mona Rivera reports

“They can’t go to sleep because of new landing patterns at LaGuardia, we have a group of people in the East Hills-Roslyn area who can’t get a full night’s sleep because they’re awake at 5 o’clock in the morning from airplanes landing at LaGuardia,” he said.

CBS2’s Jennifer McLogan reported that the FAA announced new flights plans for 200 planes a day last fall but insisted the aircraft would fly at 10,000 feet — too high to be heard.

“The problem is, is that when they made those changes it had a ripple effect and the ripple effect is what is driving, primarily, the landings down lower which is causing the problems,” Schaier said.

The FAA said the redesign would allow for more efficient use of airspace and cut flight delays plaguing New York airspace.

Meanwhile, new rules to cut helicopter noise on Long Island have stalled in Congress.

  • Martha

    “Several points some of you are missing. This is number one a safety issue. The FAA is allowing planes to fly below mandated altitudes (2500 ft) over communities that are many many miles from JFK. The altitude is critical since the FAA reports that 99% of all “aircraft bird” strikes occur at altitudes BELOW 2500 ft. Has anyone ever noticed the number of Canadian Geese in and around Eisenhower Park or the several golf courses below the VOR/DME approach into JFK 22L. Anyone remember the”miracle on the Hudson” bird strike incident? The other safety issue is that this approach is a “visual” one in which pilots basically see significant landmarks to guide them into 22L. Many of these pilots are with foreign airlines with limited knowledge of Nassau County & often times have a language barrier in conversing with Air Traffic Controllers.Anyone remember Avianca flight 52 crash on January 25, 1990. Language difficulties was cited by NTSB as a major contributor to the tragedy.The other thing to realize is that the lower a plane flies jet exhaust and chemicals fall onto smaller and narrower areas creating serious potential health issues. ” 7/20/11 | pascalechris7227 I AGRE WITH THIS COMMENT THE FAA, cONGRESS AND REPRESENTATIVES OF NY NEED TO HELP US TO KEEP AWAY NOISE CONTAMINATION.



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