News

After 61 Years, Port Authority To Stop Taking Toll Tickets

File - Traffic drives over the George Washington Bridge in New York City. (Photo by Spencer Platt/Getty Images)

File – Traffic drives over the George Washington Bridge in New York City. (Photo by Spencer Platt/Getty Images)

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TRENTON, N.J. (CBSNewYork/AP) – The Port Authority will soon stop accepting toll tickets nearly 61 years after first issuing them to speed the ride.

Toll Scrip and Universal tickets will no longer be good at the agency’s bridges and tunnels beginning July 1. The Port Authority will refund tickets at their original sales value.

The Port Authority first issued the tickets in 1951 to improve traffic flow and reduce congestion. Buyers received a 10 percent discount and the tickets were “good until used.”

Steve Coleman, spokesman for the Port Authority, said they’re not sure how many tickets are actually out in the public.

“We really have no idea how many are out there given the fact that we really haven’t sold them since 1997 which is 15 years ago,” he said. “But obviously there could be some that still exists out there.”

The agency stopped selling them after it started using E-ZPass.

For more information or for instructions on obtaining a refund, click here.

(TM and Copyright 2012 CBS Radio Inc. and its relevant subsidiaries. CBS RADIO and EYE Logo TM and Copyright 2012 CBS Broadcasting Inc. Used under license. All Rights Reserved. This material may not be published, broadcast, rewritten, or redistributed. The Associated Press contributed to this report.)