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‘Fearless Felix’ Lands Safely In Skydive From 23 Miles Above Earth

Pilot Felix Baumgartner of Austria is seen before his jump during the first manned test flight for Red Bull Stratos on March 15, 2012 in Roswell, New Mexico. In this test he reach the altitude 21800 meters (71500 ft) and landed safely near Roswell. Red Bull Stratos is a mission to the edge of the earth's atmosphere, where upon reaching altitude of 120,000 feet by helium balloon, pilot and basejumper Felix Baumgartner will then freefall to the ground in an attempt to break the speed of sound. (Photo by Jay Nemeth/Red Bull via Getty Images)

Pilot Felix Baumgartner of Austria is seen before his jump during the first manned test flight for Red Bull Stratos on March 15, 2012 in Roswell, New Mexico. In this test he reach the altitude 21800 meters (71500 ft) and landed safely near Roswell. Red Bull Stratos is a mission to the edge of the earth’s atmosphere, where upon reaching altitude of 120,000 feet by helium balloon, pilot and basejumper Felix Baumgartner will then freefall to the ground in an attempt to break the speed of sound. (Photo by Jay Nemeth/Red Bull via Getty Images)

ROSWELL, N.M. (CBSNewYork) – Former Austrian paratrooper Felix Baumgartner landed safely Sunday afternoon in his record-breaking attempt to break the sound barrier with a skydive from 23 miles up.

The Associated Press reported Baumgartner landed in the desert in eastern New Mexico after jumping from 28,000 feet. He lifted his arms in a sign of victory upon landing, the AP reported.

Baumgartner had to postpone two jump attempts last week due to high winds and earlier had his jump delayed Sunday because of wind.

But later Sunday, he took off in a pressurized capsule that was carried by a 30-million-cubic-foot balloon designed to lift him to the stratosphere.

Baumgartner has jumped into a near-vacuum without any oxygen in the fastest, farthest free fall from the highest-ever manned balloon, the Associated Press reports.

Baumgartner wore a high-tech pressurized suit as he jumped above Roswell, New Mexico. Any contact with the capsule could have ripped the suit, exposing Baumgartner to dangerous or even lethal conditions, the AP reports.

Baumgarten was seeking break the record set by Joe Kittinger, who jumped from 19.5 miles up and barely missed breaking the sound barrier. Kittinger topped out at 614 miles per hour in his jump.

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