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Cuomo: Clean Up Debris In Advance Of Nor’easter

Governor Says To Catalogue Your Losses; 60 MPH Winds Possible Wednesday
Superstorm Sandy damage on Staten Island

Damage on Staten Island is extensive, but residents say all the attention other parts of NYC and N.J. have received in the aftermath of Superstorm Sandy has dwarfed the little help they’ve received. (Photo: CBS 2)

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NEW YORK (CBSNewYork) — New York Gov. Andrew Cuomo on Monday warned that the Nor’easter forecast to strike the metro area later this week could make a bad situation worse in the wake of Superstorm Sandy.

“The storm forecast is a serious storm, but under normal conditions, it wouldn’t be that problematic,” Cuomo said. “This is complicated, because it is a storm that would approach before we recover from the first storm, and will hit communities, some of which may not have power, some of which may already have flooding,” Cuomo said. “So it complicates the situation.”

In particular, the debris that has been left strewn about in front of many homes after the hurricane will pose a problem, Cuomo said. He said many people left the debris outside because insurance companies require proof of loss before a claim is issued.

But state regulators have made certain that there will be other ways to show a proof of loss to insurance companies, Cuomo said. On Monday, the state issued a directive to insurance companies to accept an inventory and photos as proof.

“What we’re asking you to do this evening is make a list of items that that you believe are covered by insurance, take photographs of them, keep the list, keep the photograph, and get rid of the rest of your material,” he said.

That way, debris will not be sent back into the air when the Nor’easter arrives.

CBS 2 Meteorologist Lonnie Quinn said the Nor’easter was in the Memphis area as of Monday and was to push toward the Carolinas, before making a turn to head right up the Eastern Seaboard.

The center is expected to be offshore, bringing in a northeasterly wind.

New York metro residents can expect to see about an inch of cold rain, and snow is even possible in areas far to the northwest. Gusty northeast winds are expected, and could reach 60 mph, particularly on eastern sections of Long Island.

The National Weather Service issued a coastal flood watch for all area counties with a coastline for Wednesday. Flooding and storm surges are a risk, Quinn said.

Are you preparing for the Nor’easter? Leave your comments below…