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Freehold, NJ Residents Say They’ll ‘Get Through’ Despite 13 Inches Of Snow, Sandy Damage

Additional Power Outages Come At A Time When Temps Expected To Dip
Joe Haug, 77, uses his snow blower to clear out sidewalks and driveways for neighbors who are sick in Freehold, New Jersey. (credit: CBS 2)

Joe Haug, 77, uses his snow blower to clear out sidewalks and driveways for neighbors who are sick in Freehold, New Jersey. (credit: CBS 2)

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FREEHOLD, N.J. (CBSNewYork) — While it has been hard enough for our area dealing with all the damage caused by Superstorm Sandy, being slammed with more than a foot of snow on top of it has certainly not been easy.

But that is just the card that residents in Freehold, which got 13 inches of snow, were dealt.

People were left shoveling snow following a miserable week of dealing with Sandy’s aftermath. Wednesday’s nor’easter brought down power lines and utility poles in parts of the town.

“It’s rough, but we’ll get through,” Walter Thomas told CBS 2’s Christine Sloan on Thursday. “We’re trapped until they get the tree down.”

Thomas and his sons got stuck in their home when the hurricane brought power lines and a tree down.

“It’s like we’re trapped here and I’m very like afraid,” Matthew Walters said.

Joe Haug, 77, who lives on the same street, said he used his snow blower to clear out sidewalks and driveways for neighbors who are sick.

“The worse part is clearing up the driveways where the snow plows pile up those big piles,” Haug said.

Other residents in Freehold Township were still without power Thursday, forcing them to take refuge in warm coffee shops.

“We lost a whole bunch of trees in front and back of our house,” Robert Thompson said.

Still, CBS 2’s Sloan did find dogs and children enjoying the snow, including sisters who had been out of school for almost two weeks.

“We have been like really pulling our hair out almost — because we are so bored,” one girl said.

The sisters said they did lose power after Superstorm Sandy and were frightened because they “didn’t know what was going to happen.”

Meanwhile, the downed power lines and trees were making things especially difficult for crews to plow streets.

On top of that, the additional power outages came at an inopportune time as temperatures in some parts of the Tri-State Area were expected to drop below 30 degrees.