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Today Marks 45th Anniversary Of Super Bowl I

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NEW YORK (CBSNewYork) - What has evolved into a national American holiday began 46 years ago this afternoon.

It wasn’t yet called Super Bowl I and the first “AFL-NFL World Championship Game” — was quaint by today’s standards.

“4,000 pigeons have been released here in the Los Angeles Coliseum,” said an announcer that day in 1967.

For one thing, they couldn’t give tickets away. For another, they had to explain the rules that were tailored to accommodate the two leagues.

“After a touchdown, the teams will kick, run, or pass for one extra point. The AFL two point option is not in effect,” said the announcer.

On top of that: “Remember, the National Football League ball will be used when the National Football League team is on offense. The American League when the AFL team is on offense.”

That’s right, they had to change the balls depending on who had it – the Green Bay Packers (NFL, now NFC) or the Kansas City Chiefs (AFL, now AFC).

The first Super Bowl was televised by BOTH CBS and NBC, but during the second half kickoff, NBC was still in commercial.

So, they kicked it again! But the announcers weren’t told why and were totally confused.

“It comes under the question of your guess is as good as mine,” said one broadcaster.

“As to what happened on the last play, a very odd play. Green Bay kicked off. A lot of the Kansas City people didn’t move, just stoof there pointing at something and I don’t know what they were pointing at.”

Then WCBS 880 sports broadcaster Pat Summerall was part of the broadcast and did the report from the dressing room.

“Win or lose, it’s a pretty good afternoon,” he said at the time. Yes, they played the game in the daylight.

He wasn’t sure what to call Pete Rozelle.

“Are you, as commissioner of the two, what is your title now?” he asked.

“Well, I’m commissioner of the two leagues,” he said.

It was the first and last Super Bowl to feature empty seats – 30,000 of them, even though the most expensive ticket was just $12.

The total attendance at the Los Angeles Memorial Coliseum was 61,946 and the final score was Green Bay 35, Kansas City 10.